SANTA ROSA VALLEY Community News


Welcome To Your Community News Page



Santa Rosa Valley MAC Meeting
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Join us to find out what is happening in Santa Rosa Valley and voice your
concerns and ideas. Public meeting!
LOCATION
Rancho Santa Rosa Property Owners Association Clubhouse
11701 E Las Posas Rd
Websitespace Email

Rosemary Allison, Chair
E-Mail: rosemaryallison@aol.com

Ruth Means, Vice-Chair
E-Mail: ruth.means@verizon.net

Janis Gardner
E-Mail: janis@panacea-ent.com

Mark Burley
Email: MarkBurley@aol.com

Kevin Cannon
E-Mail: avoking@roadrunner.com
  • Rattlesnake Avoidance Training for Dogs
    Posted on: 2016-09-02
    Hello everyone,
    For those who enjoy the outdoors with your dogs or those living in homes backed up to hillsides and in rural areas, rattlesnakes can be
    a great risk to your dog requiring emergency medical care and the cost involved can rise quickly.
    Rattlesnake Avoidance Training will teach your dog to avoid the sight, sound and the smell of a rattlesnake once they become aware of one
    to give you peace of mind and potentially save both you and your dogs' life by alerting you to the presence of a rattlesnake.

    Training will be held on September 11th

    Pre-Registration Required
    Space is Limited - Sign Up Now to Reserve Your Spot!

    Click Here to register http://www.snakesafedog.com/upcoming-dates.html
    Click Here For information http://www.snakesafedog.com/home.html
  • Camrosa Board Declares
    Posted on: 2015-06-03
    On May 28, 2015, the Camrosa Board of Directors signed and adopted Resolution No. 15-07 Declaring a Stage Three Water Supply Shortage in Accordance with Ordinance 40-10.


    Camrosa’s supply-shortage stages are cumulative, meaning that the requirements of Stage One (adopted 08/27/2014) and Stage Two all apply under Stage Three. Below is a summary of requirements adopted by the Board on May 28:

    Outdoor landscape irrigation (lawn watering, etc.) with potable water is limited to TWO DAYS A WEEK, between the hours of 5 p.m. and 9 a.m.
    Filling or refilling pools is prohibited except for health and safety reasons
    No new potable water service will be provided
    Water leaks are to be corrected in 24 hours
    Wash-down of hard pavement is prohibited
    Drinking water to be served only upon request at eating or drinking facilities
    For details, please see our Emergency Stages with excerpts from Ordinance 40-10.

    Stage Three also states that “the District may implement other water use requirements as determined by the Board to meet water supply shortage or water emergency conditions.” If additional drought contingencies arise and the Board determines further action is required, our customers will be duly noticed, and this page will continue to be updated.

    Bringing the District to Stage Three is a recognition that the current drought needs to be taken seriously. We all need to increase our conservation efforts, Districtwide, to meet Governor Brown’s statewide potable water use reduction mandate. The State Water Resources Control Board’s emergency drought regulations, which are meant to achieve the statewide 25-percent reduction goal and went into effect May 18, 2015, divide California’s water agencies into conservation tiers based on residential gallons per capita per day water use in the summer of 2014. Camrosa Water District is in tier nine, which requires that residential, industrial, commercial, and public water users are being required by the state to reduce their water use by 36 percent.

    Starting in June, we’ll be including some information on your bill to help you keep track of your water use compared to the 2013 baseline. A note on how to read that new bill will be included.

    We—the staff and the Board—recognize that 36 percent is a big, imposing number, and that many of you are diligent water users who’ve been working hard for years to be as efficient as possible. Thank you for doing your part.


    There’s a ways yet to go, but as long as we stick together, stay responsible, and help one another out, we will be able to get through this thing okay.

    To see how you can start conserving today, see our Conservation page.
  • Kathy Long Announces Retirement from County of Ventura Board of Supervisors
    Posted on: 2015-06-03
    Kathy Long, the longest-serving member of the Board of Supervisors and an unflappable force in Ventura County government for nearly two decades, said Thursday she will retire next year when her current term expires.

    “Obviously, it’s something I’ve put a lot a thought into, just as I did four years ago,” said Long, 64. “It’s just time.”

    Long began her career in government service in the 1980s as an aide to famed Detroit Mayor Coleman Young. After moving to Ventura County, she began working in county government in 1991 on the staff of her predecessor, former Supervisor Maggie Kildee.

    Long, who lives in Camarillo, represents a district that includes Camarillo, the Santa Clara River Valley, Port Hueneme and parts of Oxnard. She was elected supervisor in 1996, and is now in her fifth term on the board.

    Her colleagues said Long has been a steadfast influence on the board.

    “She’s been a steady and strong supporter of the county and the services we offer,” said Supervisor Linda Parks, of Thousand Oaks. “With the relationships she has forged with divergent groups, she’s been a real statesman. She has made an incredibly positive mark on the county.”

    Supervisor Steve Bennett, of Ventura, said Long’s imminent departure will be “a loss for all of us who are committed to good government. There is no elected official who I’ve worked with who has had a stronger commitment to good government.”

    Supervisor John Zaragoza, of Oxnard, said Long has been a mentor to him. “Her experience has meant a lot to the board,” he said. “She always looked out for the entire community, and she absolutely studies every issue.”

    Long said she made public her decision early so that people in the community who may have an interest in running for the office will have time to make decisions and begin building support.

    Camarillo City Councilman Mike Morgan, 68, who lost three previous campaigns against Long, wasted no time. He said Thursday that he will run again for the seat and will make a formal announcement next month. Morgan said he had intended to run even had Long decided to seek a sixth term.

    Former Assemblyman Jeff Gorell, 44, said in a text message he plans to consult with others about the possibility of seeking the seat. He said he intends to give it “strong consideration.”

    Others who have been mentioned as potential candidates include Camarillo Councilman Kevin Kildee, the stepson of the former supervisor; and Merrill Berge, president and founder of a group called Camarillo Sustainable Growth, who last fall led successful citizen opposition to a proposed 2,500-unit housing development near the foot of the Conejo Grade.

    Berge said Thursday that she “will take a look” at becoming a candidate, and expressed hope that someone will continue the legacy of the two strong women who have represented the area for decades.

    She called Long “a class act” whose leadership skills have enabled her to be “a real bridge among all constituencies” in a diverse district.

    Kildee, who noted anyone following Long has “big shoes to fill,” said he plans to talk with his family and will consider entering the race.

    Long said that while she may eventually endorse a candidate for the seat, she will step back and observe whoever decides to become a candidate.

    “It’s not for me to look at the field and anoint someone,” she said.

    Long is one of three Democrats on a five-member board that also includes Republican Peter Foy, of Simi Valley, and Parks, an independent.

    Her retirement could jeopardize the longtime Democratic majority on the board, but Long said party affiliation should make no difference for those considering running for supervisor.

    “It’s a nonpartisan seat,” she said. “The success of county and city governments is that all those seats are nonpartisan.”

    Long said one thing she will be looking for is a candidate who will serve the district’s low-income residents in Santa Paula and Fillmore.

    “Someone needs to be able to step up and acknowledge that community,” she said. “The Santa Clara Valley brought me to the dance. I care about them.”

    As for her plans for the future, Long said she looks forward to traveling with her husband, Randy, and watching their son graduate from CSU Northridge.

    She noted that she has 18 months remaining her term and that she intends to work as hard as ever until it ends. Beyond that, however, her plans are far more leisurely.
    “I plan to travel, play golf, read good books, drink good wine and dance a lot.”

  • NEWS ABOUT CAMROSA
    Posted on: 2015-04-04
    LOOK AT THIS NEWS ARTICLE AND ON AIR INFORMATION ABOUT CAMROSA
    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Beating-the-Drought-With-Desalination--and-Without-the-Ocean-298546681.html
  • Are you baking a pie for the 2015 No Place Like Hope Picnic & Pie Auction?
    Posted on: 2015-02-11
    Rosemary Allison, a 'Founding Sponsor' of this incredible event originated the idea of adding the “Old Fashion Pie Auction” to the exciting venue during this annual event with the goal of raising money and awareness for the California Coastal Rescue. Rosemary and her neighbors, pie auction virgins in the flesh, offered to bake pies for the event in 2013 and 2014. Santa Rosa's very own Mark Burley was the auctioneer egging people to bid higher and higher. The started out about $15.00 - $20.00 for each pie - but many of the pies were sold for $100.00 or more from the frenzied bidders!!
    You can still be part of this 'crusty hullabaloo' by contacting Rosemary Allison at: 805 491-2100 or rosemaryallison@aol.com
    California Coastal Horse Rescue and Riley's Rescue are announcing the fourth annual edition of There's No Place Like Hope Family Picnic and Hoedown, which will benefit the rescue of endangered horses across the nation. The all-day event and festival will take place on May 3, 2014 from 11 a.m. To 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa Valley Equestrian Park located at: 10241 Hill Canyon Road in Santa Rosa Valley. There will be live miniature horses, a special emphasis on the history of equestrian live music, art exhibitions, children's games, square dancing, food, barbecue, drinks and other items for sale from various vendors.
  • Looking for a place to Babysit your Dog while you are gone?
    Posted on: 2015-02-10
    Located in the beautiful Santa Rosa Valley, Laughing Dog Inn is every dog lover’s dream come true. A boarding and daycare facility for well-socialized dogs, puppies and seniors, Laughing Dog Inn prides itself on offering top-notch care for your dog while you vacation, want a day off or would like your dog to have a safe place to play. Here your dog will have the opportunity to play outside in large yards, always supervised, with other kind-hearted canines. Large and small dogs romp about in separate yards as do older dogs and puppies. When it’s time to rest, between 12-2PM, or sleep for the night, everyone is inside in their own pen in climate controlled rooms.

    The Inn remains small enough to offer personalized care for your best friend. The staff ratio is 1 person for every 8 dogs and as most of the staff has worked at the Inn for about 5 years, we have a highly experienced team of people who absolutely love dogs. Individual needs are catered to, whether it be special meal preparation, medication administration or extra support for a frightened dog.

    During playtime the staff and our doggy guests frequently engage in a game of catch the ball, fun obedience, water play or just plain roughhousing. It’s all very good natured and safe!

    Jessica Grahm, the owner, developed Laughing Dog Inn about 11 years ago and last year it went through a major reconstruction. She is very proud of what has been created, likening it to a fine wine which has matured wonderfully over time. Jessica is a Breeder of Merit with the American Kennel Club and has spent the majority of her adult life learning about and loving dogs. She has a Master’s Degree in Psychology which she finds is very helpful in her work with dogs.

    The environment created at the Inn is calm, safe, and peaceful resulting in dogs that remain free of stress while out of their homes. Visitors often comment that they are amazed at the absence of barking which is a certain sign that everyone is feeling secure and happy. Many a dog has been known to bark in delight as their guardians drive up the hill on Escollera to go to the Inn.

    Because we want to maintain a very safe environment all dogs must be evaluated before they can schedule a vacation or a day of play. Visits are by appointment only as people just ‘dropping by’ can trigger the alarm system in dogs, disturbing the peaceful ambiance, and making things less safe. To schedule a visit or if you have any questions call 805.798.2457.

    We look forward to meeting you and your dog!
  • ROSEMARY ALLISON RECOGNIZED FOR GENEROSITY TO YMCA
    Posted on: 2015-02-07
    David Murdock led the applause in recognition of the generous pledge from Rosemary Allison of Coldwell Banker and her family, as the lead donors, of the $50,000 Wishing Wellness Welcome Entry. Rosemary Allison, Coldwell Banker's Estate Director Bill and Anya Morton of Calabasas and Dr David Diehl, Maximized LIFE Chiropractic uniting with, Colonel Jerry & Mary Knotts, YMCA Board Member Jordan & Sherry Lippell, The Medders Family, and The Weidenweber Family Fund of the Oregon Jewish Community Foundation. This group of donors will be recognized through Wishing Wellness Welcome Entry.
    'The front entrance concept envisioned by our funding/event consultant Mardy Medders is to welcome and highlight the Triunfo YMCA and park as an intergenerational, inclusive learning and fitness center, to be enjoyed by our entire Regional Community.

    On hand to commemorate Rosemary's large donation was David Murdock, who stated 'I love this woman for her generosity to this community'.

    'Obviously Rosemary Allison's generous philanthropy for all our regional communities is deeply appreciated and her generosity to advocate with our footprint at the Thousand Oaks Mall kiosk is fun for everyone to look at as we build this site for everyone to enjoy!' States Triunfo YMCA executive Director, Ronnie Stone.

    For additional joint and single naming opportunities information, please call Ronnie Stone, Executive Director, Triunfo YMCA at 818-707-9622. Private site tours are available as well as a virtual tour at www.triunfoy.org
    Join Rosemary Allison, as a founding donor in one of the many “naming opportunities” small and large, in the upcoming, full-service Triunfo YMCA facility. Its design will reflect a focus on community, family and fellowship.
    “I consider this as a fun way to be a part of the history of our area, as well as a “physical reminder” for my children and grandchildren affirming our commitment and support we gave to strengthen their community. When lives are improved, communities are, too. Each and every one of us has the ability, whether large or small, to contribute. I feel the most important legacy we can leave our future generations is teaching them that 'doing good” can build a sense of self-worth, and a true feeling of pride for their contribution to creating a better world.”

    The new, full-service Triunfo YMCA facility will be approximately 50,000 square feet and its design will reflect a focus on community, family and fellowship. The facility’s features will include:

    • A Gymnasium and full basketball court to provide practice and game space for league sports.
    • A Natatorium with two indoor swimming pools for swim lessons, competitive swim team, warm water therapy, lap swim, water exercise and recreational swim.
    • A Child Watch area staffed by trained caretakers. Children will participate in positive social experiences in a secure environment while parents and guardians enjoy the Y facilities.
    • The Dole Interactive Learning Center and Café where healthy snacks will be available and youth and adults will learn about nutrition and healthy living strategies.
    • Locker and changing facilities for men and women, as well as special changing areas for children.
    • A Welcome Lobby that will provide opportunities for families and individuals to socialize and become more connected in an open and inviting space.
    • Multipurpose and community meeting spaces and offices.

    The Westlake Village Park will feature:
    • Eight acres of lighted athletic fields for baseball, softball, lacrosse, soccer and other sports. The new fields will provide space for an estimated 5,400 children and adults to participate in competitive and recreational sports leagues and programs.
    • A Tot Lot with child-safe playground equipment for toddlers and young children. Equipment will engage children of both low and high mobility.
    • A Skate Park for children and teens that will provide a safe facility to play, practice and socialize.
    • Jogging and walking paths around the perimeter of the site.
    • An outdoor green space and picnic facilities for families, friends and groups to gather in fellowship over an outdoor meal, engage in lawn games, or simply enjoy the fresh air.
    • Concession and restroom facilities.
    Affirm for posterity your commitment to support this community!

  • PATRICK AND CATHY WARBURTON HONORED BY ST. JUDE'S
    Posted on: 2015-02-06
    The Orange County Friends of St. Jude held their 11th Anniversary Gala, benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, at the St. Regis (Monarch Beach) in Dana Point, California. Honorary Chairs Patrick and Cathy Warburton were honored with the coveted Diamond Award for their years of dedication and service to the children of St. Jude. Patrick, known for starring in Rules of Engagement, Family Guy and numerous roles in current films as well as his wife, Cathy, have raised millions for St. Jude. Members of their family and close friends were in attendance to join the applause in recognition of their accomplishments.

    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is the global leader in finding cures and saving children from cancer and other deadly diseases.

    As a longtime friend and neighbor, I was proud to be in attendance, recognizing the good things that Patrick and Cathy have accomplished on behalf of St. Jude. I had the opportunity to meet some of the kids who have received life saving treatment at St. Jude. Patrick and Cathy can be rest assured that their fundraising efforts have directly benefited and saved the lives of hundreds of children across our nation and the world. I am looking forward to the 2015 Warburton!


    The 2015 Warburton Celebrity Golf Tournament benefitting St. Jude Children's Research Hospital will be held March 5-8 in Palm Desert, CA. Golf will be played at the JW Marriott, their host hotel, and at The Classic Club. Registration for golf will be limited to 48 four-person teams (192 individuals) plus 48 celebrities. Each team will be assigned a celebrity partner for the weekend.

    In addition, there are four opportunities for the public to enjoy this special weekend and benefit St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
    The Warburton St. Jude 5k
    THE STORY BEHIND THE STORY: SONGWRITERS NIGHT
    JAM SESSION FEATURING ROCK & ROLL HALL OF FAME ICONS AND SPECIAL SURPRISE GUESTS PROVIDING A NIGHT OF GREAT MUSIC
    SATURDAY SOIREE

    For more information go to: www.patrickwarburtongolf.com/Events

  • Tropical Paradise - Board of Supervisors Deny Appeal
    Posted on: 2014-10-02

    VENTURA, Calif. - A Santa Rosa Valley wedding venue that has divided the affluent rural community lost its fight Tuesday for a five-year extension of its operating permit.





    The Ventura County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to uphold the county Planning Commission’s decision in June not to renew Tropical Paradise’s permit, which expires Dec. 23, 2014.





    Supervisor Peter Foy dissented at the conclusion of a three-plus-hour hearing on the venue’s appeal.





    Since opening in 2009, the site has been the subject of noise complaints from many residents in Santa Rosa Valley. Other residents say they do not hear the venue’s music and partying guests or that the noise does not bother them. But it was the opponents’ arguments that the venue is incompatible with the scenic neighborhood of sprawling seven-figure homes, picturesque hills and agricultural land that convinced the board. Opponents included the Santa Rosa Valley Municipal Advisory Council, which advises the board.





    “We’re seeing clearly that it’s incompatible with people not being able to enjoy the peace and quiet of their homes,” Supervisor Linda Parks said.





    Supervisor Kathy Long agreed. “This is a square peg in a round hole,” she said. “It’s just not going to fit.”





    The Planning Commission denied the permit renewal on a 4-0 vote with the fifth commissioner, Paul Magie, absent.





    Tropical Paradise owner Bryan Mimaki appealed to the board, arguing that the commission disregarded that the venue has complied with all county codes, ordinances and regulations. Mimaki added that Planning Commission staff reports found the venue is compatible with the Santa Rosa Valley and has never been issued a violation.





    Planning Director Kim Prillhart recommended the commission grant the permit extension. She later recommended the board deny the appeal.





    Mimaki wasn’t present at Tuesday’s hearing, but his representative, Steve Pearlman, argued Tropical Paradise has just as many community supporters as detractors. A number of them wore pink “Save Tropical Paradise” stickers on their clothes.





    Opponent Caren Steinberg, one of about three dozen speakers to address the board, said many of the supporters live outside the Santa Rosa Valley.


    She played two audio recordings she said were made at neighbors’ residences of Tropical Paradise wedding parties. The din was considerable.





    One of the venue’s leading opponents, Amy Elliott, who lives about 500 feet away, said she is not “a NIMBY, elitist snob, bully or person against small business. My concerns are ... noise, additional traffic, setting a precedent for more wedding venues in the area.”





    A number of speakers urged the board to grant the permit extension.“I’m really shocked how easy it is to take down a fully compliant business,” said Lori Lyche.


    Another supporter, Giselle Yeatman, urged the board to consider a compromise solution such as extending the venue’s permit for a shorter period.


    “I hope that you can find a way that it can be a win-win for both sides,” she said.





    After the board’s vote, Pearlman said Tropical Paradise had no other moves to make. He said he doubted Mimaki would challenge the board’s decision in court. “We’re very disappointed,” he said. “But when you get that kind of opposition, it’s very hard to overcome. It’s almost impossible in this county.”


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------






    Elliott said she was relieved by the board’s decision, but not elated.





    “I’m happy, I’m pleased, but just like after the Planning Commission’s vote, sad too,” she said. “It’s a sad situation for Tropical Paradise, but in reality, what has been expressed by both the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors - this venue should not have been approved in 2009 based on the proximity to homes. The terms of a 'conditional use permit' is just that. The venue is not compatible with the rural community character of the Santa Rosa Valley.





    I think the best quotes were from Supervisor Kathy Long who stated, ' “This is a square peg in a round hole,” she said. “It’s just not going to fit.” and Supervisor Linda Parks who said: 'We’re seeing clearly that it’s incompatible with people not being able to enjoy the peace and quiet of their homes'





    Amy feels that the decision was due in large part to the cumulative efforts of neighbors, who like her, were most affected by the noise. The silver lining for both John and Amy was meeting and getting to know so many of their neighbors and creating lasting friendships.



    Amy knew that the slide show presented by Caryn Steinberg, prepared by Doug Price, Jen Bell; and Alisha Cohen, were especially compelling in that they presented the true number of homes that had voiced opposition to the venue and the noise. Some of the other members of the committee of neighbors included Joe Hettinger, Larry and Ilene Cohen and Caryn Steinberg whose research into the legal aspects of residential zoning was very informative. Amy appreciated the efforts of the members of the Santa Rosa Valley MAC and wanted to give a strong salute to our Ventura County Supervisor who stayed neutral - but was always willing to listen.
    Today, Amy feels especially grateful to the many residents who took the time out of their busy schedules to join them at the Board of Supervisor meeting Thursday and to those that contacted her to express their appreciation for the decision that was rendered and to thank her for her role in the outcome.
    The planning commission made their decision June 2014 not to renew based on the following:
    1. The venue is not compatible with the rural community character of the Santa Rosa Valley.
    2. The venue presents an obnoxious nuisance to at least some of the Santa Rosa Valley residents.
  • October is National Cyber Security Awareness month
    Posted on: 2014-10-02
    From Cal Lutheran University courtesy of Cindy Keitel
    October is National Cyber Security Awareness month, or as the government calls it, NCSAM. We kick off the month with the growing and unfortunately effective topic of Phishing. According to EMC, Phishing scams netted $5.9B in 2013.



    What is Phishing?

    Simply put Phishing is a scam, a technique used to gain personal information for purposes of identity theft, using fraudulent e-mail messages that appear to come from legitimate businesses. The messages are designed to look authentic, so that recipients are coerced into divulging personal data such as account numbers and passwords, credit card numbers and Social Security numbers.

    According to Symantec, worldwide:

    · 156 Million Phishing emails sent a day

    · 16 Million make it through email

    · 8 Million Phishing emails are opened

    · 800,000 Phishing emails are clicked through

    · 80,000 fall victim, sharing personal data via a Phishing scam



    How to identify a phishing scam

    It may be difficult to identify a phishing scam simply by looking at Web page that opens when you click a link in a an e-mail message. However, clues in the address can reveal the deception. Look for the following:
    •Phishers often substitute similar-looking characters for the real characters in a URL. For example, they might use a “1” (numerical one) in place of lowercase “L”- think paypa1.com rather than paypal.com.
    •Some phishers use domain names that are similar to those legitimate companies. For example, walmartorder.com, the real company Wal-Mart does not include order in its domain name. Some use the same domain name but will change the .com to .org.
    •If there’s a link within the body of the email, hover your mouse over the email before clicking to verify that what is displayed matches the destination. If you do decide to click-through, make sure the address line of the page that loads matches the domain you want to go to. An email may contain a link that looks innocent, but is redirecting you somewhere else. As an example, hover your mouse over our link http://www.callutheran.edu/iss; the link will not take you to the ISS site.

    What to do if you think you are a victim?
    •If you believe your financial accounts may be compromised, contact your financial institution immediately and work with them on any account that might have been compromised. Watch for any unexplainable charges to your account. Immediately change any passwords you might have revealed.
    •If you used the same password for multiple resources, make sure to change it for each account, and do not use that password in the future.
    •Follow instructions on the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, CFPB web site for further information.
  • W. Johnson Ornamental & Building Stone
    Posted on: 2014-06-27
    Family owned and operated since 1943. We carry a large selection of natural stone for landscaping and stone masonry. We have flagstone, wall stone, landscape boulders, decorative stones, cobblestone, ledgestone, and ground cover. We can cut and polish rock and we make rock water features on site. We also offer FREE delivery on qualified orders. Call or visit us today to check out our unbeatably low prices.
  • CUP permit Approval Standards for Tropical Paradise
    Posted on: 2014-05-31
    Below are some of the CUP permit Approval Standards for Tropical Paradise and I Believe, all other Event CUP Applicants in the area. ITEMS A THRU F are what they must adhere too, please read and ask yourself how or IF they are compliant. Sec. 8111-L.2.I.L - Permit Approval Standards
    Planned Development and Conditional Use Permits may only be granted if all billed fees and charges for processing the application request that are due for payment have been paid, and ˇf all of the following standards,
    notwithstanding subsection 'e' below, are met, or if such conditions and
    limitations, including time limits, as the decision-making authority deems
    necessary, are imposed to allow the standards to be met, The applicant shall have the burden of proving to the satisfaction of the appropriate decision making authority that the following standards can be met. Specific factual findings shall be made by the decision-making authority to support the conclusion that each of these standards, if applicable, can be satisfied.
    a. The proposed development is consistent with the intent and provisions of the County's General Plan and of Division 8, Chapters 1 and 2, of the
    Ventura County Ordinance Code;
    b. The proposed development is compatible with the character of
    surrounding, legally established development;
    c. The proposed development would not be obnoxious or harmful, or impair the utility of neighboring property or uses;
    d. The proposed development would not be detrimental to the public
    interest, health, safety, convenience, or welfare;
    e. The proposed development, if allowed by a Conditional Use Permit, is
    compatible with existing and potential land uses in the general area
    where the development is to be located; and
    f . The proposed development will occur on a legal lot.
    (AM. ORD. 4123 - el17/s6)
  • WHAT PIE ARE YOU BAKING FOR THE OLD FASHION PIE AUCTION?
    Posted on: 2014-04-08
    NO PLACE LIKE HOPE FAMILY PICNIC AND HOEDOWN
    Hosted by Riley’s Rescue – Benefitting the California Coastal Rescue
    Sunday May 4th 2014
    Live Pie Auction hosted by Rosemary Allison & Mark Burley
    Rosemary Allison, a 'Founding Triple Crown Sponsor' of this incredible event originated the idea of adding the “Old Fashion Pie Auction” to the exciting venue during this annual event with the goal of raising money and awareness for the California Coastal Rescue. Rosemary and her neighbors, pie auction virgins in the flesh, offered to bake pies for the 2013 event. Santa Rosa's very own Mark Burley was the auctioneer egging people to bid higher and higher. The started out about $15.00 - $20.00 for each pie - but many of the pies were sold for $100.00 or more from the frenzied bidders!!
    You can still be part of this 'crusty hullabaloo' by contacting Rosemary Allison at: 805 491-2100 or rosemaryallison@aol.com
    California Coastal Horse Rescue and Riley's Rescue are announcing the fourth annual edition of There's No Place Like Hope Family Picnic and Hoedown, which will benefit the rescue of endangered horses across the nation. The all-day event and festival will take place on May 4, 2014 from 11 a.m. To 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa Valley Equestrian Park located at: 10241 Hill Canyon Road in Santa Rosa Valley. There will be live miniature horses, live music, art exhibitions, children's games, square dancing, food, barbecue, drinks and other items for sale from various vendors.
    There's No Place Like Hope Family Picnic and Hoedown, will take place on Sunday, May 4th, from 11 a.m. To 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa Valley Equestrian Park located at: 10241 Hill Canyon Road, in the Santa Rosa Valley area of Camarillo. For more information on the event or if you are interested in taking part of this 'crusty hullabaloo' by baking a pie for the pie auction by contact Rosemary Allison at: 805 491-2100 or rosemaryallison@aol.com
  • From Bridlewood Resident - Kimme Black
    Posted on: 2014-04-08
    Subject: Important Memo from Kimme
    Dear Friends: Sometimes big changes come in the quietest of places. This is what is happening right now on the California Coastline. The California Coastal Commission (CCC) has proposed an amendment that would end forever the right of landowners to farm their fields and provide food for themselves, their families and their communities. This is a disastrous state of affairs, especially crucial at a time when many of us are trying to fight the big agricultural industry giants and their genetically modified products. Whereas much of the world is shunning the types of food products so prevalent in our country, the CCC is taking steps to prevent us from growing and buying local, fresh and healthy produce. The first front is the California coast; Santa Rosa Valley may be next; the right to farm your own little plot of land may very well be facing a great challenge. PLEASE READ MY LETTER BELOW, FEEL FREE TO COPY AND PUT YOUR NAME ON IT, OR WRITE YOUR OWN AND SEND IT ASAP TO THE LINK HERE BELOW. TIME IS ESSENTIAL HERE. Thank you! Kimme


    https://www.change.org/petitions/local-coastal-program-protect-the-future-of-farming-in-the-santa-monica-mountains

    Dear Members of the Calif. Coastal Commission:
    I am writing to urge you to reconsider you plan to implement LCP Amendment No. LCP-4-LAC-14-0108-4, which would put limitations on property owners who engage in agricultural production, and/or limit new property owners from engaging in agricultural activities.
    As a discerning consumer who tries hard to carefully select only organic products for my large family, I see this as an egregious mistake and an enormous step backwards in a state that has always been a bellwether to the world in many industries, especially those regarding the health and welfare of its citizens.
    Limiting local growers, curtailing the vital small farm agricultural industry at a time when the entire country is engaged in a battle against the non-foods produced by factory farming Leviathans, will be viewed by future generations as a dubious decision made from unsound data. For many of us our greatest comfort when feeding our families comes from knowing our produce was locally grown. Furthermore, the seacoast with its temperate and moist air is a perfect environment for growth, both for humans and the fauna that depend upon it for their survival.
    In short, to the thoughtful members of this commission, halting the growth and development of individuals who wish to participate in an agricultural industry that influenced the epic founding of this great nation, and that is the single most important movement that fueled the development of civilization, is an idea that will surely lead to the impoverishment of our greatest source of sustainability; the ability to have control over the nourishment of our families and their welfare.
    Thank you for your kind consideration of these thoughts.
    Sincerely,
    Mrs. K. Isaiah Black
    Santa Rosa Valley, California 93012
  • BEWARE OF YOUR PETS COYOTES got Bridlewood Pet
    Posted on: 2014-04-08
    Just heard that a coyote attacked a small dog on Rosedale Court in Bridlewood - be careful of when your pets are outside especially near dawn and dusk! ALSO multiple sightings of mountain lions. The coyotes are coming down due to the lack of water in the hills. BEWARE AND BE ALERT!
  • SCE Edison 2014
    Posted on: 2014-04-03
    Click here for more details
  • SOAR 2050
    Posted on: 2014-04-03
  • Good Plumber/Septic Guy
    Posted on: 2013-11-08
    Found a great plumber/Rooter/Septic guy who has very good pricing and seems to be honest and cares about his work
    Martin's Rooter
    1101 W. 7th St #1
    Oxnard, CA 93030
    805-276-5516
    Martin Salis
  • Santa Rosa Park Community Involvement Pays Off
    Posted on: 2013-09-10
    From Rick Rentler -Glenside Lane Resident

    Hello Rosemary, I called the Dept. of Parks for VTA County today to comment about the FEES that went into effect Aug 1. They indicated that due to involvement of Supervisor Linda Parks, and the community involvement and responses like mine and many many others, Santa Rosa Park is once again a FREE park!!

    I've been a homeowner since 1983, built my house myself, and have used the Hill Canyon/Wildwood trails almost weekly since moving here. You could imagine how we felt when we first saw the Iron Ranger erected. It was like OUR park had been bureaucratically hijacked.

    But all is good once again...

    Regards,
    -Rick Rentler (Glenside Lane)
  • Set of Keys Found on Duval - did you lose a set? Chevy Car key!
    Posted on: 2013-09-10
    Call Rosemary if you are missing a set of keys!
  • Join me in welcoming the Nichol Family to Santa Rosa Valley!
    Posted on: 2013-07-07
    Their family is a welcome addition to the Valley!
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Loss of Adda Oren
    Posted on: 2013-03-12
    Adda Arloween Oren of Santa Rosa Valley passed away February 27, 2013, after a brief illness. She was born June 20, 1922, and has been a Ventura County resident for 37 years.
    Mom was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. After raising her family in the San Fernando Valley, she and her husband, Bob built a home in the Santa Rosa Valley where they raised paint show horses. Moms main hobbies were crocheting, tatting, bobbin lace, and knitting. She won numerous first place awards showing them at the Ventura County Fair.
    Mom is survived by her sister, Ruth Dean of Santa Maria; her son, Jack Oren (Karen); daughters, Lynette Malone (Rob), Shirley DeFazio (Fred) all of La Conchita, and daughter, Pam Stack (Ron) of Simi Valley. Mom is also survived by 10 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren. We believe dad came down from heaven, scooped her in his arms and they are together again for all eternity.
    A celebration of her life will be held at a future date.
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Passing of Patricia Dwyer
    Posted on: 2013-03-12
    Patricia Dwyer migrated to US from Mexico early on in her life and lived in San Francisco for some years. She was clever and intelligent girl. She put herself through school and learned to be a bookkeeper. She and her husband Les were also in Real estate investing and I had the honor of representing them in their Ventura County transactions. .

    Her husband and the love of her life, Walter Leslie Dwyer, who was known as Les, passed away in July of 2000. She missed him each and every day. Patricia and Les Dwyer bought their Santa Rosa Valley home when it was a brand new 'Carriage Estate' in 1982.

    Patricia has two younger sisters in Mexico and a large in laws family in Orange county. Pat was a wonderful neighbor to all and she will be missed greatly. She loved to bring gifts to her friends, our family looked forward to her yearly delivery of the pickles she had cured herself.
    Services for Pat will be at: Saint Pascal Baylon Church
    155 E Janss Rd Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
    Thursday, March 14 10:30 a.m.

    She will be buried after the services at: Conejo Mountain Memorial Park Cemetery 25052 Howard Road
    Camarillo, CA 93010
    The grave is at: Lot 7, Row 7, Saint Nicholes 2
    Call Rosemary Allison for more information:
    805 491-2100
    Her close neighbor and friend Bernadette Eyre supplied most of the above information.

  • Stop Conejo Creek Web Site is up and running!
    Posted on: 2013-01-24
    For those of you who have been following the development of the Conejo Creek project, I want to let you know about a wonderful new website that has been developed to keep you abreast of the current information.

    Please take a moment to go to the website; each of the community action groups have their own page on the new website. There is information on how this development affects Santa Rosa Valley. Please let your neighbors and others know about the many negative impacts this huge development would have if it were to be passed. Sign the online petition!
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Passing of Barbara Wolfe
    Posted on: 2013-01-24
    Santa Rosa Valley lost one its brightest stars, when Barbara Wolfe lost her battle with cancer Sunday. Barbara and her husband Mike have lived in Santa Rosa Valley for over 25 years. She and Mike shared a wonderful life, having been together since they were 14 years old. Barbara was a devoted mother to her two sons Sean and Brandon and her daughter Rachel and was also a proud and loving grandmother to her 5 precious grandchildren. The memory of her love, strength, and faith will live on in the hearts of her family and friends. She taught spinning class at Spectrum and students will forever have the memories of her spinning to the music of Abba and Mama Mia imprinted in their memory. I remember her when she first came to Santa Rosa Valley...and watching as she transformed each home she purchased into a showplace. Barbara was a powerful strong happy loving motivating woman who always looked amazing. Barbara truly loved her family with all her passion.

    God saw you getting tired
    and a cure was not to be
    so he put his arms around you
    and whispered,
    'Come to Me'

    With tearful eyes we watched you
    and saw you pass away
    and although we love you dearly
    we could not make you stay.

    A Golden heart stopped beating
    hard working hands at rest.
    God broke our hearts to prove to us
    He only takes the best

    Barbara, You were an inspiration to us all in so many ways - your sense of humor, ablity to laugh at yourself and for being such a fighter.

    You will be missed.


    Barbara was an inspiration to us all in so many ways - her sense of humor, able to laugh at herself and for being such a fighter. Barbara was fortunate to have the close friendship the last 20+ years of fellow Santa Rosa resident Barbara DiPoma who helped care for Barbara during her battle with cancer. Barbara Wolfe was lucky that she had a team of friends who helped care for her. Barbara DiPoma was especially precious to her as she stood by her lending an ear, making her laugh, giving her hope, showing support and helping her cope. Barbara was so very fortunate to have her close friiends, amazing husband and loving family in her life. I cannot believe she passed away - she was always so full of life.
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Loss of Jerry Virnig
    Posted on: 2013-01-07
    Jerry Virnig, former president of independent film lab CFI, passed away last month. In addition to Jerry's contributions to Santa Rosa Valley he was a respected veteran of the Hollywood post-production community,

    Virnig was a former president of independent film lab CFI, which he joined in 1966 after graduating from USC with a degree in business. He rose through the ranks of CFI, becoming the laboratory's first liaison to production companies filming on location and later sales manager and vice president of sales and marketing. He succeeded Tom Ellington as president of CFI in 1992, serving in that position until he retired five years later.
    Virnig was known as a friend and supporter of cinematographers, directors and producers of independent films, continuing a tradition established by CFI executive and visionary Sid Solow.
    'Jerry was a throwback to the days when film labs had the ability to support independent filmmakers, even when they didn't have the budgets to realize their dreams,'' said Bob Beitcher, a friend of Virnig and his successor at CFI, which was acquired by Technicolor. Beitcher is currently chief executive of the Motion Picture and Television Fund.

    After his retirement, Virnig taught a course on filmmaking at Columbia College Hollywood and was instrumental in founding the Worldwide Motion Picture Laboratory Assn., a consortium of leading independent international film labs dedicated to sharing technical information and providing an alternative to the industry's two leading players, Deluxe and Technicolor. In 2002, Technicolor North Hollywood honored Virnig by naming one of its screening rooms after him.

    He is survived by wife Charlene, children Lynn, Jeff and Mike, and grandson Connor. The family requests that donations in his honor be made to the American Heart Assn., American Cancer Society and the Palliative Care Program of the Motion Picture and Television Fund.
  • WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU had your Septic Tank Pumped?
    Posted on: 2013-01-05
    The septic-tank-soil-treatment system (also called a septic system) is an effective, long-standing method for collecting, treating, and disposing of sewage from rural and suburban homes. Septic systems are used in every county in North Carolina: more than 50 percent of the homes have them, and new systems are being installed at a rate of 40,000 per year. This fact sheet will answer some typical questions about septic systems and their maintenance.



    Why Use a Septic System?
    Septic systems are used when sewage treatment plants are not accessible. They safely treat and dispose of wastewaters produced in the bathroom, kitchen, and laundry. These wastewaters may contain disease-causing germs and pollutants that must be treated to protect human health and the environment. Although septic systems are usually a permanent solution to wastewater treatment and disposal, they sometimes serve as a temporary solution until sewer lines are installed.



    What Is a Septic System?
    There are a number of different septic systems, each with its own design. The conventional system is the one most commonly used in North Carolina (Figure 1). It consists of three main parts: the septic tank, the drainfield, and the soil beneath the drainfield.

    The septic tank is a watertight concrete box about 9 feet long and 5 feet tall. It is buried in the ground just outside the home. The tank is usually precast from reinforced concrete and can be purchased from concrete manufacturers. While typically designed with a 1,000-gallon liquid capacity, the size of the tank is legally determined by the number of bedrooms in the home. The tank temporarily holds household wastes and allows a small amount of pretreatment to take place (Figure 2).

    The tank is connected to the drainfield by a buried pipe. A typical drainfield consists of two to five trenches excavated into the subsoil. In many systems, a distribution box or a flow divider helps move wastewater to each trench. In most conventional septic systems, the trenches are 3 feet wide, 2 to 3 feet deep, and 9 feet apart. In each trench, a 1-foot thick layer of washed gravel or stone is placed around a 4-inch-diameter perforated distribution pipe. After the trenches are covered with soil, the area must be landscaped to keep surface waters from ponding over the drainfield.

    The drainfield has also been called the nitrification field or the soil absorption field. The sole purpose of the drainfield is to deliver wastewater to the soil. The soil purifies the wastewater by removing the germs and chemicals before they reach the groundwater or any adjacent surface waters such as rivers, lakes, and estuaries.


    Figure 1. A conventional septic system.


    Figure 2. A two-compartment septic system.




    What Takes Place in the Tank?
    All of the wastewaters from the home should flow into the septic tank. Even waters from the shower, bathtub, and washing machine can contain disease-causing germs or environmental pollutants. As wastewater flows into the tank, the heavier solid materials settle to the bottom (forming a sludge layer), the lighter greases and fats float to the top (forming a scum layer), and the liquid (sewage effluent) flows out of the tank. An outlet baffle (or a sanitary tee at the outlet end) prevents solids from flowing out with the liquids. The tank's primary purpose is to retain the solids while releasing sewage effluent to the drainfield.



    What Happens in the Drainfileld and the Soil?
    The real treatment of the wastewater occurs in the soil beneath the drainfield. Sewage effluent flows out of the tank as a cloudy liquid that still contains many disease-causing germs and environmental pollutants. Effluent flows into the perforated pipe in the trenches, passes through the holes in the pipe, and then trickles down through the gravel to the soil. As effluent enters and flows through the soil, many of the bacteria that can cause diseases are filtered out. Some of the smaller germs, such as viruses, are adsorbed by the soil until they are destroyed. The soil can also retain certain chemicals, including phosphorus and some forms of nitrogen.



    Where Can a Septic System Be Used?
    Unlike a sewer system, which discharges treated wastewater into a body of water, the septic system depends on the soil around the home to treat and dispose of sewage effluent (Figure 3). For this reason, a septic system can be used only on soils that will adequately absorb and purify the effluent. If a septic system is installed in soil that cannot do so, the effluent will seep out onto the soil surface overlying the drainfield. In addition to causing an unpleasant smell, this untreated effluent can pose health problems.

    In some cases where the soils do not adequately absorb the wastewater, the toilets and sinks might not drain freely. If the soil can absorb the effluent but not treat it, the sewage may contaminate the groundwater.


    Figure 3. Wastewater treatment and disposal in the soil.
    (Adapted from Tyler et al., 1977)



    What Kinds of Soils Are Best Suited to Conventional Systems?
    Gently sloping, thick, permeable soils with deep water tables make the best sites. The soil should be a uniform brown, yellow, or bright red, and it should not have spots of gray, which often indicate that it is excessively wet. The soil texture should be neither too sandy nor too clayey, and it should have good aggregation, or structure (that is, a handful of the soil should easily break apart into small aggregates). Avoid areas that have rock close to the surface, very sticky clays, or soil layers that restrict the downward flow of water.



    How Do I Know If My Site Is Suitable for a Septic System?
    There are more than 400 kinds of soils in North Carolina, more than one of which are often found within a 1-acre lot. Because many of these soils are unsuitable for septic systems, you should always have your county environmental health specialist (sanitarian) conduct a comprehensive soil and site investigation. If you are considering purchasing a piece of land for a homesite, you can obtain additional information from the Cooperative Extension Service publication (AG-439-12), Investigate Before You Invest.



    How Large Is a Typical Drainfield?
    Usually, the drainfield can fit within the front yard or the backyard of a typical 1-acre homesite. The precise area requirements will depend upon the kinds of soils at the homesite, the size of the house (the number of bedrooms), and the topography of the lot. A site with clayey, slowly permeable soils needs a larger drainfield to absorb the sewage effluent than does a site with sandy, permeable soils. Adequate land area must be available to isolate the entire septic system from any nearby wells, springs, streams, lakes, or other bodies of water. There also must be enough area to install a replacement system in case it is ever needed. This replacement area must meet the same soil and site requirements as the original system.



    What Legal Requirements Regulate Septic Systems?
    State law requires that soils be evaluated by the local health department and that an improvement permit be issued before house construction begins or the septic system is installed. Also, the installation must be approved by the health department before electrical service can be permanently connected to the home and the septic system put into use.



    What Maintenance Is Needed?
    Both the septic tank and the drainfield must be properly maintained. With conscientious maintenance, the system should work correctly for many years. Such maintenance begins with water use and waste disposal habits. Since your family will determine which materials enter the system, you should establish rules for proper use and maintenance.

    The suggestions outlined in the box will save you anguish and money when applied to most conventional systems. More sophisticated systems require additional maintenance, possibly at much greater cost. Also, recent rule changes now require owners of some alternative septic systems and community septic systems to hire a certified operator to maintain their systems. For more information about these requirements, contact your local health department.



    Tips for Maintaining Your Septic System
    Do not put too much water into the septic system; typical water use is about 50 gallons per day for each person in the family.

    Do not add materials (chemicals, sanitary napkins, applicators, and so on) other than domestic wastewater.

    Restrict the use of your garbage disposal.

    Do not pour grease or cooking oils down the sink drain.

    Make a diagram showing the location of your tank drainfield and repair area.

    Install a watertight concrete riser over the septic tank to simplify access.

    Periodically have the solids pumped out of the septic tank.

    Maintain adequate vegetative cover over the drainfield.

    Keep surface waters away from the tank and drainfield.

    Keep automobiles and heavy equipment off the system.

    Do not plan any building additions, pools, driveways, or other construction work near the septic system or the repair area.




    Will I Need to Pump the Tank?
    After a few years, the solids that accumulate in the septic tank should be pumped out and disposed of at an approved location. If not removed, these solids will eventually overflow, accumulate in the drainfield, and clog the pores (openings) in the soil.

    This blockage severely damages the drainfield. While some clogging of soil pores slowly occurs even in a properly functioning system, excess solids from a poorly maintained tank can completely close all soil pores so that no wastewater can flow into the soil. The sewage effluent will then either back up into the house or flow across the ground surface over the drainfield. If this happens, you may need to construct a new drainfield on a different part of your lot. Pumping the septic tank after the soil drainfield has become completely clogged will not rejuvenate the system. It will provide only a few days reprieve until the tank fills up again.



    How Will I Know When to Pump the Tank?
    The frequency with which you will need to pump depends on three variables: the size of your tank, the volume of your wastewater, and the solids content of your wastewater. If you are unsure about when to have the tank pumped, observe the yearly rate of solids accumulation. The tank should be pumped if the sludge layer has built up to within 25 to 33 percent of the liquid capacity of the tank. Therefore, a typical 1,000 gallon tank with a 4-foot liquid capacity should be pumped when the solids are 1-foot thick in the bottom of the tank. If the tank is not easily accessible, you may wish to inspect and pump it according to the frequency guidelines in Table 1. Your local health department should be able to tell you the size of your tank. When inspecting the tank, check the sanitary tee or the outlet baffle to be sure that it has not broken off and dropped into the tank. Also, be sure to have both compartments of the tank pumped.

    Table 1. Estimated Septic Tank Inspection and Pumping Frequency in Years
    Tank Size
    (gallons) Number of People Using the System
    1 2 4 6 8
    900 11 5 2 1 <1
    1,000 12 6 3 2 1
    1,250 16 8 3 2 1
    1,500 19 9 4 3 2
    Source: Adapted from 'Estimated Septic Tank Pumping Frequency,' by Karen Mancl, 1984. Journal of Environmental Engineering. Volume 110.

    If the septic system is not used very often (as in an infrequently used vacation home with a correctly sized tank), it will probably not need to be pumped as frequently as indicated in the table. If you use a garbage disposal, the tank may need to be pumped more frequently. After a few inspections, you should be able to adjust the schedule according to the rate at which solids accumulate.



    What Should Not Be Put into the Septic System?
    Make sure you are aware of the types and amounts of extra waste materials that are poured down the drain. Limiting the use of your garbage disposal will minimize the flow of excess solids to your tank. Garbage disposals usually double the amount of solids added to the tank.

    Do not pour cooking greases, oils, and fats down the drain. Grease hardens in the septic tank and accumulates until it clogs the inlet or outlet. Grease poured down the drain with hot water may flow through the septic tank and clog soil pores completely.

    Pesticides, paints, paint thinners, solvents, disinfectants, poisons, and other household chemicals should not be dumped down the drain into a septic system because they may kill soil microorganisms that help purify the sewage. Also, some organic chemicals will flow untreated through the septic tank and the soil, thus contaminating the underlying groundwater.



    Are Septic-Tank Cleaners Necessary?
    No. These products include biologically based materials (bacteria, enzymes, and yeast), inorganic chemicals (acids and bases), or organic chemicals (including solvents). They do not reduce the need for regular pumping of the septic tank. Some of these products contain organic chemicals and may even damage the drainfield or contaminate the groundwater and nearby wells.



    Is Special Care Needed for the Drainfield?
    Yes. The drainfield does not have an unlimited capacity. The more water your family uses, the greater the likelihood of problems with the septic system.

    Water conservation practices can help reduce the amount of wastewater generated in the home. Periodically check your plumbing for leaky faucets and toilets. Uncorrected leaks can more than double the amount of water you use. Many soils that can absorb the 200 to 250 gallons of sewage usually produced each day by a family of four would become waterlogged if an extra 250 gallons were added. For more information on this subject see North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service publications HE-250, Focus on Residential Water Conservation and HE-213, Water Management Checklist for the Home.

    Be sure that foundation drains, roof waters, gutter waters, and surface waters from driveways and other paved areas do not flow over the septic tank or the drainfield. Careful landscaping can help direct excess surface waters away from the system.



    What about Alternatives to the Conventional System?
    Other types of septic systems are sometimes used on sites where the soil is not suited to a conventional system. Where soils are too wet or too shallow for the conventional system, the drainfield might be placed very close to the ground surface in the upper layers of the soil. In some wet soils, artificial drainage around the septic system lowers the level of the shallow water table. On some clayey soils that have a thick sandy surface, the low-pressure pipe (LPP) system provides an alternative. A wrapped pipe 8 to 10 inches in diameter is sometimes used in gravelless, hand-dug trenches on very steep slopes.

    On some soils that are not deep enough to provide adequate treatment of the sewage effluent, it may be possible to use an aerobic treatment unit (ATU) to supplement the soil's treatment capacity.



    Summary
    The septic system is an efficient, inexpensive, and convenient method for treating and disposing of household wastewater. Because not all soils are suited for conventional systems, a comprehensive soil and site investigation must be performed before you purchase any land.

    Septic systems will adequately absorb and purify wastewater if they are properly maintained. A few precautions can save you anguish and money. Reducing water use, avoiding grease, pumping the tank periodically, and properly landscaping the yard to keep surface water away from the tank and drainfield are inexpensive precautions that can help assure your system a long life. The Cooperative Extension Service publication (AG-439-22) Septic System Owner's Guide summarizes some important day-to-day management and periodic maintenance activities to improve the longevity of your system. When properly located and maintained, your system should provide years of trouble-free, low-cost service.



    Reference
    Tyler, E. T., R. Laak, E. McCoy, and S. S. Sandhu. 1977. 'The Soil as a Treatment System.' in Home Sewage Treatment. ASAE publication 5-77.
  • Ventura County Sheriff’s Office has developed an iPhone App
    Posted on: 2012-12-11
    Narrative:
    In the ongoing effort to keep the community informed by reaching out through a variety of channels, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office has developed an iPhone App that is available to the public at no charge.
    The App can be downloaded from the iTunes App Store by searching one of the following key words: VCSO, VCSD, Ventura, or Sheriff.
    The App allows users to access crime maps showing the locations of various offenses, locate information about inmates currently in custody, read press releases, and learn about current patrol events. In addition, there is information about the history of the Sheriff’s Office and a directory of phone numbers and locations of Sheriff’s substations.
    The App also features a link to Ventura County Crimestoppers so the public can be aware of those people in the community who are wanted on outstanding warrants.
    The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office is committed to providing the public with convenient access to our services. With the number of smart phones steadily increasing, giving people an easy way to learn about what we are doing in the community is important.
    The Sheriff’s Office is also working on a version that will be compatible with Android devices.

  • Fire Prevention Fee Levied against some Santa Rosa Valley Homeowners
    Posted on: 2012-12-11
    Alert: State Fire Fee Bills Being Sent to Local Residents

    This is the link to the forms for the protest of the Fire Prevention Fee
    http://firetaxprotest.org/

    Within the next week, thousands of 44th Assembly District residents in certain unincorporated areas will be receiving in the mail a new state tax bill charging property owners an additional fee for fire prevention services within the “State Responsibility Area” (SRA). The office of Assemblyman Jeff Gorell (R-Camarillo) is asking the media to help inform residents of this new bill and the very short time window allowed to challenge or appeal an erroneous fee. People throughout the state have already reported receiving bills charging them for properties that were not located in areas of state responsibility, or for non-residential structures to which the new tax should not legally apply.
    It is important that anyone who receives one of these State Fire Tax bills take action immediately. Recipients only have 30 days from the date that the bill was mailed if they wish to appeal the tax.
    California residents who receive one of these tax bills from the state must pay it within 30 days. Even if the bill is sent in error, the law was written in such a way to require that property owners first pay the bill before they challenge it through appeal process. Failure to pay the fire tax can result in additional late penalties and interest.
    The State of California has created a website at firepreventionfee.org with more information about the tax and procedures for appeals. There are also a number of other websites that provide additional useful information including State Board of Equalization member George Runner’s website at calfirefee.com.
    Assemblyman Gorell did not support the new state fire tax, but wants to make sure that the fee is fairly implemented and effectively used to enhance fire protection services and improve safety in rural areas.
  • Pioneering plastic bridge opens in Santa Rosa Valley
    Posted on: 2012-12-08
    A horse is walked over the new Arroyo Santa Rosa Trail bridge after its official dedication Friday. It's the first plastic bridge built in California. Santa Rosa Valley resident Gusie Woodfill on Friday walked her horse Webster across a new bridge with a special designation that was built over the Arroyo Santa Rosa.

    The pedestrian bridge, which officially opened Friday near East Las Posas and Santa Rosa roads, has the distinction of being the first bridge on the West Coast built from recycled plastic.

    While Webster was oblivious to the crowd, which included state and county officials, Woodfill said the day meant a lot to the community.
    The bridge, built by the Santa Rosa Valley Trails Inc., was constructed to help connect a portion of a trail washed out by heavy rain.

    'We're very happy that this bridge is here,' said Woodfill, who joined neighbors and their dogs and horses to cross the bridge, which is 25 feet long and 10 feet wide.

    Mark Burley, president of Santa Rosa Valley Trails, said the Santa Rosa Valley Municipal Advisory Council approved the idea for the bridge about four years ago. Because the bridge was to be built across Ventura County Watershed Protection District property, the group also had to get approval from the county for the project.

    That was when Santa Rosa Valley resident John Johs suggested the bridge be constructed with an alternative plastic material made by New Jersey-based Axion International.

    Axion CEO Steve Silverman said the company takes laundry, shampoo and other types of No. 2 recyclable bottles and combines them with scrapped car bumpers made from polypropylene encased in fiberglass.

    'We put it together in a machine that is patented and we mold out building products such as railroad ties and bridges,' Silverman said.

    'The weather elements do not affect the product whatsoever, so water, sun, chemicals, nothing will deteriorate the product.'

    Axion International makes plastic material used for construction projects on the East Coast and in Europe.

    Bridges in Maine and Scotland and railroad bridges at an Army facility in Virginia have been built from the material. The U.S. Army has used it to build bridges at Fort Bragg, N.C., that are capable of carrying 70-ton tanks. Two more bridges are currently being completed in Ohio.

    The material, developed by Rutgers University's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has no toxic contents, doesn't leach or warp and is completely recyclable at the end of its functional life, Axion officials said.

    Dickerson said the recycled material is useful in the area because of saltwater concentrations in the environment. Steel rusts, concrete cracks and wood rots, he said.

    Marc Green, an Axion co-founder, said the bridge in the Santa Rosa Valley is the first bridge built with the recycled material west of Ohio.

    John Dickerson, a civil engineer who owns VCE Services, designed the bridge. Santa Rosa Valley-based DCA Drilling and Construction built it.

    Burley said the cost was about $50,000 and was paid for by the Santa Rosa Valley group and the Santa Rosa Valley Riders, an equestrian group. Burley said the bridge at one point had to be redesigned to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    State Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, who came to see the bridge Friday, said it could be a model for other projects throughout the state. She said using the recyclables locally instead of shipping them off to China makes sense.

    Linda Parks voted with other members of the Ventura County Board of Supervisors to allow the bridge to be made with the recycled material.

    'This will be here a long time. Now that we've started this, we have a lot of bridges that need fixing in the state of California and our county, and we can continue to use this product,' Parks said.

    Rosemary Allison, chairwoman of the Santa Rosa Valley advisory council and a real estate agent, said the bridge is a benefit to the community and horse owners.

    Allison said the council is looking to use the recycled material on a bridge in a Santa Rosa Valley equestrian park.
  • A Message from the Boyle Family
    Posted on: 2012-12-03
    Dear Santa Rosa Valley Friends and Neighbors,

    The kids and I want to express our appreciation for all the love, support and help we’ve received following the sudden death of our beloved Dave. Although nobody can take away our pain and sadness it helped tremendously to receive so much kindness from so many people.

    We are especially grateful to Marsha and Steve Hively, Kim and Lou Pagano and Dona and Jim Perry for taking over and completely organizing the reception after the services which relieved a huge burden from our family. Thanks to everyone who contributed your food, time and help. I’ll name a few that I’m aware of – Camille King, Marge Timcik, Becky Kodama, Jane Kotake, Rosemary Allison, Dave and Angela Nichols, Lynn Scheck and Michelle Azelby. I know there were many more people involved and we appreciate all of you.

    Thank you also to everyone that brought food over to the house, the offers of help and assistance that we’ve received and the very kind and thoughtful notes that you took your precious time to write.

    We are forever thankful to our dear friends, Linda and Dave Martel, for being there for us every step of the way and for all that you’ve done. Thanks to Rosemary Allison for assisting in getting the word out and for all her invaluable help.

    I know we’ve missed people that should be thanked individually but please know that we appreciate everything immensely.
    Love,

    Tammy, Stacy, Ryan, Kaitlyn and Dylan Boyle
  • 4 Things to Hoard for an Emergency
    Posted on: 2012-11-16
    Some people call it hoarding. I just call it smart. Devastating natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina, the Asian tsunami, and last year’s catastrophic earthquake in Japan have awakened many to our vulnerabilities. Add to that a spiraling housing market, jittery economic climate, and mounting job losses and it’s no wonder there’s growing interest in emergency preparedness (and stocking up on emergency disaster supplies) among families.

    Here are four emergency disaster supplies you should store up—hoard, if you like—to better face the unexpected:

    Fuel

    Whether for cooking, driving or heating, a backup supply of fuel sources is a necessity (if you have a generator, you know how vital a fuel supply can be). Gasoline can be safely housed in 5-gallon containers and rotated through every few months. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

    No-Cook Foods

    Emergencies and gourmet meals aren’t exactly compatible, but you can still eat well when the power goes out or grocery shelves are bare. Just store foods that do not require refrigeration: items like tuna, dried fruit, granola bars, peanut butter, jerky, and V-8 juice provide energy without any preparation. Few people feel up to the challenge of cooking hearty meals when a crisis hits, so the simpler the better.

    A few additional items to consider: pudding cups, seeds and nuts, packets of instant milk, and MREs (Meals Ready to Eat), which can be purchased online and in emergency supply stores. By the way, if you store canned food, don’t forget to also keep at least one manual can opener at the ready!

    Light Sources and Batteries

    It’s surprising how many emergencies bring power outages with them. Earthquakes, thunderstorms, hurricanes and tornadoes are just a few ways that nature can take down power lines, plunging homes and businesses into darkness. Have a supply of flashlights (LEDs provide the longest battery life), headlamps and lanterns along with plenty of batteries.

    You can also bring solar pathway lights indoors when the sun goes down. Be careful about using candles with open flames as a light source, though, especially with young children around.

    Water

    The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. You’ll need stored water for drinking, cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry. (Yes, neither storm nor sleet nor dark of night will put off the need to do laundry for very long!)

    Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be store outdoors.

    In addition to water, be sure to also have at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

    Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

    Lisa Bedford, author of Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst Case Scenarios, also blogs at www.thesurvivalmom.com. She believes there is power and peace in being prepared.
  • HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE..
    Posted on: 2012-11-16
    Let's say it's 6.15pm and you're going home (alone of course), ...after an unusually hard day on the job. You're really tired, upset and frustrated. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to drag out into your arm and up into your jaw. You are only about five miles (8kms) from the hospital nearest your home. Unfortunately you don't know if you'll be able to make it that far. You have been trained in CPR, but the guy that taught the course did not tell you how to perform it on yourself..!!

    NOW HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE..

    Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness.
    However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously.A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest.

    A breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let-up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating.
    The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital.

    Rather than sharing jokes please.. contribute by Sharing this which can save a person's life!!!!
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Loss of Dave Boyle
    Posted on: 2012-11-13
    David Boyle, 53, of Camarillo, died suddenly of an aortic dissection on November 7, 2012, at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks.

    David was a well-known building contractor for over three decades who built hundreds of custom homes all over Southern California, in Beverly Hills, Malibu, Ojai, Camarillo, Creston, and many other areas.

    David was born in Encino on December 11, 1958, to Patrick and Nadine Boyle. He grew up in Thousand Oaks and was active in the Boy Scouts with his father and earned his Eagle Scout.

    David graduated from Thousand Oaks High School in 1977.

    David enjoyed carpentry at a young age working with his uncle and cousins. He started his own company after high school and obtained his contractors license in 1980.

    David attended California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, earning a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management in 1984.

    While at Cal Poly, David met his future wife and love of his life, Tammy. They were married on September 23, 1989, and started a family of four beautiful children. David was proud of his family, loved his wife and children. He was a caring father who took every opportunity to spend time with his children.

    David was physically a mountain of a man with a heart to match, whose generosity and passion for life was contagious to everyone who knew him. He enjoyed nothing better than to have his family and friends with him at home.

    David loved to cook, even more he loved to share his cooking. He would proudly offer samples of this or that, always with a big smile and a question, 'What do you think?' whether it was his kalua pig roast, Thanksgiving dinner, or Christmas with his giant Christmas tree, the whole family would always enjoy being at Dave and Tammy's, where there was always room for more people and plenty of great food to share.

    David loved the outdoors and his hobbies reflected that. Be it riding ATV's, waterskiing on Lake Shasta, snowmobiling, he always had that infectious smile. His favorite hobby was fishing the many lakes and streams of the Eastern Sierra with his sons and daughters, friends and family. While up there, David would chat with the locals as though he'd known them for years.

    David was preceded in death by his mother Nadine in 1981 and by his father Patrick in 1994. David is survived by his wife Tammy; children Stacy, Ryan, Kaitlyn, and Dylan; sisters Laura, Denise (Graham), and Patty; stepmother Elaine (Art); stepbrother Brian (Linda); and stepsisters Arleen (Dan) and Carolyn (Russ).

    David and Tammy have a large extended family and David loved spending time with all of them.

    In lieu of flowers, the family asks that memorial contributions be given to your favorite charity in David's name.
    Link to the website to leave a message for Dave's family.
  • Camarillo considers building $50 million desalination plant
    Posted on: 2012-11-02
    By Jennifer Letzer
    Originally published 04:56 p.m., November 1, 2012
    Updated 05:59 p.m., November 1, 2012

    Camarillo is looking into building a $50 million groundwater desalination plant to improve water quality and reduce its dependence on imported water.

    The Camarillo Department of Public Works is proposing the plant for a place between St. John's Pleasant Valley Hospital and Lewis Road, near where two wells exist. The plant would help treat the highly salted groundwater that comes from Las Posas Basin in the north end of the city.

    The project was discussed at a study session with the City Council last week. An analysis of the amount of water in the wells and the effect it could have on the city has been completed. In December, the department plans to present the findings to the Fox Canyon Groundwater Management Agency, which manages aquifers in much of Ventura County.

    'The water quality is diminishing noticeably, and we either have to abandon the wells or provide treatment,' said Tom Fox, Camarillo public works director.

    Groundwater levels in Las Posas Basin have risen about 10 feet a year, Fox said. At that rate, the water may overflow into the Pleasant Valley Basin, possibly diminishing the quality of well water throughout the city.

    'If we don't do something to draw out this water source, it will continue to spill over and we'll eventually have some high groundwater problems,' Fox said. 'Doing nothing is not an option.'

    Camarillo has set aside about $15 million for the project, Fox said. The Camrosa and Calleguas Municipal water districts have agreed to pay about 40 percent of the costs of the plant and of maintenance and operation for one year, which officials estimate will be about $8 million.

    The city hopes to look for state grants to help finance the remaining costs, Fox said.

    The project also calls for building two new wells near the desalination plant. The new wells and the existing two in the north end of the city will be connected to the plant.

    Camarillo currently pumps 4,500 acre-feet of groundwater per year and buys 5,500 acre-feet imported by Calleguas to meet the city's needs. One acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons, or enough to supply an average family for a year.

    The analysis says the city could pump 7,500 acre-feet annually for 25 years, the average life span of a desalination plant, according to Fox.

    For their contributions to the project, Calleguas and Camrosa would have access to more water for their customers in Thousand Oaks and east Camarillo.

    'It's a trade. They will have 3,000 acre-feet of water delivered to them that they already paid for,' Fox said.

    If the project is rejected, city officials said, they would abandon the two wells in the north and build one well elsewhere to try to maintain pumping at 4,500 acre-feet. They would also continue buying the 5,500 acre-feet from Calleguas.

    One possible location for the new well is on the west end of the city near Camarillo Airport.
  • Santa Rosa Valley Mourns the Loss of SRTMS Teacher Sandee Tischler
    Posted on: 2012-07-14
    Sandee Tischler, a longtime teacher who taught at Santa Rosa Technology Magnet School, who lived in Thousand Oaks was killed Wednesday after a plane she was flying in with her husband crashed in Winslow, Ariz.

    Joe Tischler, 65, and his wife, Sandee, 62, were on their way to Flagstaff when their home-built Cozy Canard III crashed shortly after taking off from Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport, authorities said.

    The Tischlers had stopped at the airport for fuel and lunch about 11 a.m. After taking off, the plane crashed about 12:40 into a field not far from the end of the runway, according to the Navajo County Sheriff's Office. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

    The Tischlers were taken by helicopter to Flagstaff Medical Center. Joe Tischler, who was flying the plane, was seriously injured.

    Sandee Tischler, a teacher at Santa Rosa Technology Magnet School in the Camarillo-based Pleasant Valley School District, died shortly after arriving at the hospital.

    'It's just a deep, deep loss,' fellow teacher Lara Filgas said Thursday.

    'She was the most loving and giving person you could ever be around,' said Filgas, who has taught at Santa Rosa for 13 years. 'Santa Rosa was her family. She gave everything she had to our school.'

    Sandee Tischler had taught in the district for 14 years, spending the entire time at Santa Rosa. Her colleagues said she was the first one on campus and the last one to leave.

    'Sandee was a passionate teacher who was completely committed to kids. She loved the profession of teaching,' Principal Thomas Holtke said.

    The plane was registered to Joe Tischler, according to the Federal Aviation Administration registry. It was described as a fixed-wing, single-engine plane.

    Friends said he kept the plane at the Camarillo Airport, where he was a member of the local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association.

    He bought it several years ago, said Marc Zeitlin, who provides technical support for Cozy builders. The three-seat plane was built by another man, who first flew it in 2005.

    Joe Tischler was in the process of building another Cozy plane, a four-seater, Zeitlin said.

    The Tischlers were involved in the local Scouting community. Joe Tischler, a retired engineer, is an assistant Scoutmaster and a commissioner in the Conejo Valley district, said Lee Hess, who has known the Tischlers for 20 years.

    Hess was early in his Scoutmaster days when the family joined his Scout Troop 718. Even after the Tischlers' boys grew up and left Scouting, the Tischlers stayed and volunteered their time, Hess said. Sandee Tischler served on committees and went to summer camp nearly every year.

    The Tischlers' three sons left Thursday morning to be with their father in Arizona, Hess said.

    Sandee Tischler was sweet and giving, someone with one of the softest voices he knew, Hess said.

    'She was incredibly giving of her time and talent,' he said.

    On her classroom page on the Santa Rosa school's website, she described herself as happily married with three sons.

    'I have a cocker spaniel named Rock, a shepherd-Lab mix named Chase and a Chinese box turtle named Martha,' she wrote. 'I enjoy camping, traveling, reading, going to plays and musicals, listening to music, Scouting and teaching.'

    According to news reports, she also testified in the 2001 trial of Cora Caro, who was convicted and sent to death row for fatally shooting three of her four sons in 1999. Sandee Tischler had taught two of the slain sons.

    On Thursday, school district officials sent an email to staff members to let them know about the crash. Kim Michaud, president of the district's teachers union, also contacted Sandee Tischler's colleagues.

    'Everyone has said that she was very giving, generous and sweet,' Michaud said Thursday.

    Filgas said Sandee Tischler was always the one who remembered everyone's birthdays and had cards ready for the occasion.

    Her students adored her, and she was nurturing and dedicated, Filgas said.

    'She loved what she did,' Filgas said.


    Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/jul/12/plane-registered-to-thousand-oaks-man-crashes-in/#ixzz20bj7A9x4
    - vcstar.com
  • Facebook Groups and Santa Rosa Valley
    Posted on: 2012-06-13
    Are you a Facebook Friend? Sometime ago I set up a few Facebook Pages and wanted to make sure that you know about them - in these posting you can get up to the minute local news, post information that you want out and find out about upcoming events! Take a few moments to check them out!

    1. ''Santa Rosa Valley Voice' and over 200 Friends have joined our ever growing community Group! I have given you the link below to go directly there!
  • Santa Rosa Valley Political Voices
    Posted on: 2012-06-13
    The 2012 elections are approaching!! This blog is devoted to the nuts and bolts of local politics.

    Have some political Info you want released? Let everyone know!
    The goal of this Group is to publicize fundraisers, parties, Web sites, meetup.com events and anything else happening in Ventura County. Let everyone know your views.
  • Equestrian Program Returns to Conejo Valley YMCA
    Posted on: 2012-06-13
    Children as young as five can learn about, care for and ride specially-trained horses.
    No riding experience is necessary and children as young as five can learn how to ride.Conejo Valley YMCA
    Photos

    http://moorpark.patch.com/articles/equestrian-program-returns-to-conejo-valley-ymca/media_attachments/edit?upload_started=1338566814
    An equestrian program is returning to the Conejo Valley YMCA after a several-year absence.
    Campers who enroll in Conejo YMCA summer camp will have the opportunity to learn about, care for and ride specially-trained horses as part of their summer camp experience.
    Private lessons are also available to the community. The equestrian program is a partnership between the Conejo Valley YMCA and the non-profit organization Stepping Stones Riding Program.
    'Children as young as five years old can learn to ride,' said Meaghan Shaffer, president and founder of Stepping Stones Riding Program. 'Private lessons will be available for kids and adults year round. No riding experience is necessary.'
    When Shaffer heard that the YMCA's equestrian facilities were not in use, she contacted the Y and the program was soon created. It officially kicks off when summer camp begins on June 4 with lessons beginning in July.
    'A lot of children have never been exposed to horses,' said Shaffer. 'Campers will learn how to brush them and ride them in the arena and along horse trails right at the Y. It will be a great experience.'
    “The equestrian program is another benefit of Conejo Valley YMCA summer camp,' said Meghan Lopez, the Y's youth development director. 'The property at the Y lends itself to weeks packed with a variety of adventures.'
    Private lessons are $25 per lesson ($20 for a 10-lesson package) for Y members and $30 per lesson ($25 for a 10-lesson package) for non-members.
    Lessons are conducted by experienced volunteers. Lesson fees go toward feeding the horses and purchasing supplies.
    'Donations are always welcome for pipe corrals, tack, feed and other items,' said Shaffer.
    The Conejo Valley YMCA serves Thousand Oaks, Moorpark and Santa Rosa Valley. For more information, go to http://www.sevymca.org/conejo/, call 805.523.7613 or email Stepping Stones Riding Program at steppingstonesridingprogram@gmail.com.
    About this column: This information came from a press release sent directly to Moorpark Patch. It may have been edited for clarity and brevity.Related Topics:Conejo Valley YMCA, Equestrian Program, and Summer Camps

  • A child in need
    Posted on: 2012-06-13
    I just learned that one of my long time client’s (and family friends) grandchildren has Severe Aplastic Anemia and is need of blood, and a bone marrow transplant. They have set up a website for their grandson at matchjake.org seeking help by:
    Seeing if you are a blood match by a simple free cheek swab kit.
    “Liking” the website on Facebook.
    Contributions to “bethematch.org” which is a charity helping match potential donor’s with the over 10,000 patients per year who need a bone marrow transplant (but only ˝ receive one).
    Any help would be greatly appreciated !

    http://brentbishop.com/matchjake.org/
    Sincerely,

    Dane M. Johnson
  • Antique Menagerie opens in Westlake Village
    Posted on: 2012-04-06
    Get in touch with your inner Cowboy or Cowgirl!!! We all have a little inside of us!! One of my favorite vignettes in the store!! This is for all of our Santa Rosa Valley friends!!! I love the cow pic of 'Hattie and Maddie'Description
    A mesmerizing mix of European and American Antiques, Garden, Home Decor, Casual Clothing, Trinkets, Gifts and Whatnots.
    Relax and meander through vignettes that combine the treasures of yesterday with today's chic trends.
    Antique Menagerie ~ 'Establishment of Luxury and Curiosity' OUR DREAM COME TRUE!
  • Horse Boarding Camarillo
    Posted on: 2012-03-30
    Want your horse close, but not in your backyard? Want to ride the trails but not cross the road and highways? Want to get away weekends and holidays without making arrangements for horse care? Camarillo Springs Ranch is just around the corner. Our trails lead right into the Western Plateau of Santa Rosa valley. How about something different than trails? Attend our Obstacle Course clinics for something fun and different.
  • Do You Know Your Farmer?
    Posted on: 2012-03-23
    Datsusara Market Garden’s mission is to produce and sell the freshest, highest quality, naturally grown fruits and vegetables. We work to promote a sense of community, respectful stewardship of the land and the benefits of eating local. We are a small family run farm whose vegetables are now available at Santa Rosa Produce located at the intersection of E. Los Posas Rd. and Santa Rosa Road. In the Local Foods movement, there is a concept of Food Miles, the distance your food travels from field to market. With the proximity of Santa Rosa Produce to our farm, this distance is now reduced to Food Feet! We invite you to come out to Santa Rosa Produce and support a local small business and your local farmer.
  • Caregiver
    Posted on: 2012-03-06
    CNA with current CPR/BLS certification. In addition, I have 35 yrs. experience in the medical field.
    'Caregiving with a loving touch'...
  • JOIN US IN RELAY FOR LIFE EVENT
    Posted on: 2011-12-14
    American Cancer Society Relay For Life CLU
    February 25 - February 26, 2012
    Mt. Clef Stadium - map



    The American Cancer Society Relay For Life is a life-changing event that gives everyone in communities and campuses around the globe a chance to celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against the disease.

    At Relay, teams of people camp out at a local campus, park, or fairground and take turns walking or running around a track or path. Each team is asked to have a representative on the track at all times during the event. Because cancer never sleeps, Relays are overnight events up to 24 hours in length. Although every Relay For Life is different, there are certain traditions at all Relays, no matter where they are held. These traditions help participants celebrate, remember, and fight back.

    Celebrate – The Survivors Lap is an inspirational time when survivors are invited to circle the track together and help everyone celebrate the victories we’ve achieved over cancer. The Survivors Lap is an emotional example of how Relay participants are ensuring that more lives are saved each year – like those of each individual on the track.

    We also recognize and celebrate caregivers at Relay For Life. These individuals give their time, love, and support to friends, family, neighbors, and coworkers who face cancer. At Relay, people understand the frustrations and joys of being a caregiver, since the effects of cancer reach far beyond just the person diagnosed.

    Remember – In the Luminaria Ceremony After dark, we honor people who have been touched by cancer and remember loved ones lost to the disease. Candles are lit inside bags filled with sand, each one bearing the name of a person touched by cancer, and participants often walk a lap in silence. As people take time to remember, those who have walked alongside others battling cancer can grieve and find healing. This is a time that truly highlights the importance of defeating this disease.

    Fight Back – In the Fight Back Ceremony, we make a personal commitment to save lives by taking up the fight against cancer. That personal commitment may be to do something as simple as getting a screening test, quitting smoking, or talking to elected officials about cancer. By taking action, people are personally taking steps to save lives and fight back against a disease that takes too much.

    Celebrate, remember, and fight back are themes that link all Relays events together, but you can learn more about national event standards and recommendations and more about how to structure your Relay’s planning committee using a suggested three-tier approach by connecting to the documents below. Relay For Life is more than just a fundraiser. It’s a life-changing experience. At Relay, every person in the community has a chance to celebrate, remember, and fight back. And every person who participates joins others around the globe as part of this worldwide movement to end cancer.

    Everyone's reason to Relay is as unique as their own personal story. At Relay, you can find healing, comfort, and support from others who have faced cancer or who have lost a loved one to the disease. You have a chance to meet people in the community who are equally passionate about finding an end to cancer in our lifetime. You can thank all the people who have done so much to support you through your personal cancer experience. And you can gather together with friends, family, and colleagues to laugh, cry, and create lasting memories.

    No matter why you take part in Relay, however, one thing is clear: with every step you take, you are helping the American Cancer Society save lives. With your help, we aren’t just fighting one type of cancer – we’re fighting for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. Each person who shares the Relay experience can take pride in knowing that they are working to create a world where this disease will no longer threaten the lives of our loved ones or claim another year of anyone’s life.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sponsored By
    Community Service Center

    More Information
    •Contact: Cristina Markiewicz
    •Phone: (805) 312-0658
    •Email: cmarkiew@callutheran.edu
    •Web site: www.RelayForLife.org/CaliforniaLutheranUniversityCA
  • CERT TRAILER RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY
    Posted on: 2011-10-07
    On Thursday October 20th at 4:00 pm SANTA ROSA VALLEY will WELCOME THE DELIVERY
    OF A NEW COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) DISASTER TRAILER
    Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks is pleased to announce the acquisition of a new disaster trailer filled with emergency supplies to assist the residents of Santa Rosa Valley. The disaster trailer will be parked at Santa Rosa Valley Technology Magnet School located on Santa Rosa Road. It is scheduled for delivery to Santa Rosa Valley on October 20th at 4:00 PM and a reception and ribbon-cutting ceremony is planned to greet its arrival.

    Members of the Santa Rosa Valley Community Emergency Response team (CERT) Santa Rosa Valley CERT Coordinator, Rosemary Allison, ,Santa Rosa Valley Municipal Advisory Council members (MAC) Rosemary Allison, Mark Burley, Janis Gardner, Ruth Means and Don Shubert, as well as Santa Rosa Valley Residents are invited to join Firefighters, County Emergency Medical Services Agency staff and Supervisor Parks to welcome the arrival of the emergency supplies.

    “Because emergency personnel can’t be everywhere if a major disaster strikes, having trained citizens and a local supply of emergency gear can be a lifeline in a major disaster” stated Supervisor Parks.

    The trailer, which will be housed at Santa Rosa Valley Technology Magnet School was funded through a grant from the Department of Homeland Security. It is outfitted with first aid gear for treating traumas, burns and other injuries as well as shelter provisions.

    Preparing communities for disasters is part of a larger disaster preparedness effort currently being undertaken by the County of Ventura EMS Agency
  • Hand Painted Children's Clothing & Accessories
    Posted on: 2011-07-19
    Katie Hemphill, who grew up in Santa Rosa Valley has embarked on a new exciting venture with the opening of her online boutique as well as a let everyone know that she can be found at the Moorpark Farmers market every Friday! Take a moment to check out her website with some of her adorable outfits for your child or as a great present!
  • Hand Painted Children's Clothing & Accessories
    Posted on: 2011-07-19
    Katie Hemphill, who grew up in Santa Rosa Valley has embarked on a new exciting venture with the opening of her online boutique as well as a let everyone know that she can be found at the Moorpark Farmers market every Friday! Take a moment to check out her website with some of her adorable outfits for your child or as a great present!
  • Santa Rosa Valley Resident Sylvie Landon Recognized at Equestrian Event
    Posted on: 2011-05-21
    Sylvie Landon, won numerous awards at the Hollywood Charity Horse Show - held at the Equestrian Center in Burbank April 28 - May 1st.
    This great event is sponsored by celebrity equestrian, William Shatner. The show is put on to raise money for underprivileged children. Bill Shatner has sponsored this show for 21 years. This event was a return for Sylvie to show as although had been a supporter of the event for the last 17 years, she had not been one of the entrants in the last 6 years.

    Sylvie had recently purchased her horse, only three years old. Invited To A Party (aka PLAYER) out of Invitation Only mare and Zippos Old Gold. These horses are fantastic and rare to come by.

    So, Sylvie and her barn won their circuit championships in Green Western Pleasure, Novice Amateur Western Pleasure and Amateur Western Pleasure. This was their first time out. The show ran from April 28, 2011 to May 1, 2011 - she showed on April 29, 2011 and May 1, 2011. On Saturday April 30th there was a huge charity event in the banquet hall, wonderful food served by Stonefire Grill and the entertainment was a special concert headlined by Cheryl Crow.

    Brittany, Sylvie's beautiful daughter pictured next to Sylvie, gave up a trip to San Clemente and a Dodger game to be at the event and offer her mother support. Sylvie's brother, Geoff, who is in the entertainment industry, didn't have any recording sessions scheduled and was delighted to be part of Sylvie's rooting section. Sylvie had planned to enter in the Del Mar Show on May 19 - 22nd, but the warnings about the equestrian virus and the stern recommendations of her vet convinced her to hold off the next event until the virus is under control.

    According to Sylvie, 'When I first saw my horse I knew he was the one. I stopped showing for several years, maybe six, while taking care of my Mom and also my show horse that I loved dearly, had to be put down. She suffered seven fractures to her right rear leg.'

    Sylvie was speechless when the announcer announced the circuit championships for the show. She stated that she couldn't believe her ears when they announced the championships and could only say 'thank you'.

    It is very rare to win three circuit championships. One is good, two maybe, three by one horse and rider does not happen often (maybe years), Sylvie should be very proud of her accomplishment, especially when you take into consideration that she has only had her horse since April 8, 2011. In one class the judge couldn't believe 'Player' was only three because Sylvie had him in a full bridle and the judge asked Sylvie to get off, take the bit out of his mouth, just to make sure it is legal, most three year olds are in snaffles or bosals and are speedy. Player went around like a five or six year old. Perfect gentleman. Didn't look all over the place and Player and Sylvie were in perfect harmony. ZEN. Sylvie stated she had entered the show 'to get her feet wet' I think we should all congratulate her, she swam!
  • FEMA QUESTIONS – FLOOD PLAIN MAPS
    Posted on: 2011-05-14
    1)If it is related to the mapping – Am I in or am I out - call:

    1 (877) 336-2627 / 1 (877) FEMA – MAP

    2) For any and all Insurance Questions:

    FEMA website at www.floodsmart.gov

    Jena Critchfield (510) 627-7266 or 1 (888) 379-9531
    Or e-mail her at jana.critchfield@dhs.gov

    Adam Lizarraga (510) 874-1755

    3) If the question pertains to levees and if their property is located behind a levee:

    Go to the Watershed Protection District website at: www.vcwatershed.org/levee where they can type in their property address or property Assessors Parcel Number and get their answer.

    If you have specific questions about one or more of the District’s levees, please feel free to contact either Gerard Kapuscik, the District’s Levee Certification Project Manager at 805.648.9284 or via e-mail: Gerard.Kapuscik@Ventura.org
    or Norma Camacho, District Director at 805.654.2040, or via e-mail: Norma.Camacho@Ventura.org.

    4) Am I located in a Floodplain?

    a) Go to: www.vcwatershed.org/levee
    b) Go to: “AM I AFFECTED”
    c) Under “Disclaimer” check the box for “I agree to the above terms”
    d) A Property Search box will show up and ask you to “Enter Address:”
    e) After you have entered the address hit “Search”
    f) The search will show the following items:
    1) FEMA Flood Zone Definitions
    2) Address:
    3) APN10:
    4) Floodzone(s) of the property in question
    5) You can download FEMA publications at: www.vcfloodinfo.com

    6) Go to web site to see Jan. 20, 2010 FEMA DFIRM Maps:

    www.FEMA.gov

    Under: “Quick Links” go to: Flood Maps
    Under: “What are you looking for” go to: Flood Maps

    1) Select a state, District or Territory: California
    2) Select a county: Ventura County
    3) Select a community: Ventura Co uninc.
    4) Get FEMA issued Flood Maps

    Go to sheet 1 for the Index map and find the map that your property is located on and go to that map page.

    How to find a LOMC (Go to www.FEMA.gov website)
    A LOMC (Letter Of Map Change) is a letter which reflects an official revision to an effective Flood Insurance Rate Map. LOMCs are issued in place of the physical revision and republication of the effective map.

    The MSC has LOMCs available for online viewing using Adobe Acrobat Reader. When a map panel listing is displayed as a result of a Catalog query, Map Search, or Quick Search you will see a 'plus sign' next to the view button if LOMCs exist for that panel. Clicking on the 'plus sign' will expand the list of LOMCs for that panel. You may click the view button next to a LOMC to view it using Adobe Acrobat Reader.

    Note: Online viewing is only available for LOMCs in digital form. The MSC has digital LOMCs issued from June 1, 1997 through February 28, 2011. For a listing of LOMCs older than June 1, 1997 please contact the MSC.

    There are 3 ways to find a LOMC:
    Find a LOMC by Case ID
    Use this option to find a LOMC if you know the Case ID. Enter up to 8 LOMC case IDs, then click the Search button. Information for the LOMCs will be displayed in the search results.
    Find a LOMC by Map Panel ID
    Use this option if you know the map panel ID(s) but not the LOMC case ID. Enter up to 8 map panel IDs, then click the Search button. Information for the maps will be displayed in the search results. If any LOMCs are available for the map panel, a 'plus sign' will appear in the LOMC column. Click the 'plus sign to see the list of LOMCs for the map panel.
    Find a LOMC by State/County/Community
    Use this option if you only know the community that the LOMC is in. After you select a state, county and community, a list of all of the map panels for the community will be displayed. A 'plus sign' will appear in the LOMC column for map panels that have LOMCs. Click the 'plus sign to expand the list of LOMCs for the map panel.

  • There’s No Place Like Hope, Family Picnic and Hoe Down
    Posted on: 2011-05-07
    Forget the TV or face book; download your kids and bring them to the electronically challenged family picnic and hoe down on June 5th in the Santa Rosa Valley from 11 A.M. to 4 P.M. Riley’s Rescue (a non-profit org.) presents, There’s No Place Like Hope, Family Picnic and Hoe Down benefiting the California Coastal Horse Rescue (a non-profit org.). Delight in quality vendors, purveyors of fine goods and services; nuzzle up to mini horses; eat candy, cookies, fruits and vegetables, pizza and more while trembling to the sounds and spectacles of wildly pounding horse hoofs of the Foxfield Equestrian Team with their heart stopping bridle-less and bareback jumping feats! Watch the cowboy Bill Cameron, Champion Rider/Trainer who taught his horse to jump from one tall building to another, tame and woo his mighty stallion Dun! Not to miss, Hollywood for Horses, and their nostalgic gallop into medieval jousting!



    Bring the kiddies for roping magic with the ruggedly talented Hollywood trick roper Dave Thornbury; and enjoy the chance to put your loved ones in jail!! And for those who don’t crave the scent of the sweaty beast, dance until you drop to the music of MD/DJ’s PJ Events who come to us after performances at Universal’s City Walk! Love country music, come see Amanda and Travis perform live!! Feel like children again playing games in the warm green grass of the great outdoors. Cheer your favorite jitterbug team as they compete for a handsome cash bounty; judged by some of the cities finest dance instructors and an Emmy Award winning director of major studio animations and co-star of the movie Grease! And most importantly; come for the day for picnic and laughter to lift the spirits of innocent horses who have found themselves in the darkness of abuse, neglect, starvation and slaughter. Sunday, June 5th, 13165 Santa Rosa Road, Santa Rosa Valley 93012. For more information visit our web site: calcoastalhorserescue.com or

    email: Isaiah5258@aol.com

  • March/April Issue Westlake Magazine Rosemary Allison Article
    Posted on: 2011-03-09
    'VOLUNTEER'OF THE YEAR'
    Written by Kari Rodems Photos taken by Judi Bumstead
    According to Rosemary, her motivation each day comes from her desire to 'give back to the world' and to live up to the 'golden rule' or what she refers to as her 'family credo of doing unto others as you would have them do unto you '

    The day this interview took place at the Allison estate (tucked away in the Camarillo's pastoral Santa Rosa Valley) a seamless flow of workers, that included recruited friends and family members, were purposefully engaged in a dizzying array of activities, By the looks of things, this is a common occurrence around the Allison household. In addition to family members planning their annual Costco run to purchase a bounty of food for a Thanksgiving feast (a community outrcach through Loaves and Fishes) others were literally decking the halls and yard for the Meadowlark Service League's Holiday Home Tour annual fundraiser. Rosemary was quick to acknowledge 'anybody who volunteers, volunteers their whole family - so when I get involved in something the whole family steps up to support the effort' While conveying her gratefulness for her family her face was beaming as she described her husband as not only the successful owner of the top rated Cres Insurance Agency, which she proudly effused, is 'the largest Professional Liability Insurance carrier for Real Estate Brokers in California' but also as her 'anchor and incredibly supportive of everything [she] does.'

    Rosemary Allison, wife, mother, businesswoman, community organizer, elected member of the Santa Rosa Valley Municipal Advisory Council and philanthropist, recently added Ventura County's 'Volunteer of the Year' to her growing list of accomplishments. 'I think she is the most caring person with the biggest heart I have ever known' expressed Jim Allison, husband and unabashedly proud devotee of the 2010 National Philanthropist Day honoree; a distinction bestowed upon her by the Santa Barbara's Ventura County Chapters of the Association of Fund Raising Professionals.
    Aside from her cherished roles as a wife and being the mom and step-mom to five children ages 20-37, Rosemary has put her heart and soul into marketing the estates in the upscale neighborhoods of Ventura County as the Fine Homes Director of Century 21 America. For years she has consistently been ranked with the best of the best - annually breaking sales records that includes her recognition this month as the #1 top selling Century 21 agent in California and the #3 top selling agent for the entire Century 21 family of Realtors nationwide in 2010.

    According to Rosemary, her motivation each day comes from her desire to 'give back to the world' and to live up to the 'golden rule' or what she refers to as her 'family credo of doing unto others as you would have them do unto you '.

    The day this interview took place at the Allison estate (tucked away in the pastoral Santa Rosa Valley) a seamless flow of workers, that included recruited friends and family members, were purposefully engaged in a dizzying array of activities. By the looks of things, this is a common occurrence around the Allison household. In addition to family members planning their annual Costco run to purchase a bounty of food for a Thanksgiving feast (a community outrcach through Loaves and Fishes) others were literally decking the halls and yard for the Meadowlark Service League's Holiday Home Tour annual fundraiser. Rosemary was quick to acknowledge 'anybody who volunteers, volunteers the whole family - so when I get involved in something the whole family steps up to support the effort' While conveying her gratefulness for her family her face was beaming as she described her husband as not only the successful owner of the top rated Cres Insurance Agency, which she proudly effused, is 'the largest Professional Liability Insurance carrier for Real Estate Brokers in California' but also as her 'anchor and incredibly supportive of everything [she] does.'

    Rosemary was initially told about her nomination for 'Volunteer of the Year' by her friend Sandy Berg. She said 'I was completely shocked, I had no idea I was nominated ' The award came on the heels of a very successful Gala event Allison had chaired for the American Cancer Society having garnered the admiration of associates. neighbors, clients and friends over the years, under her leadership the event saw a tremendous turnout and raised more than $220,000. Being awarded at this year's National Philanthropy Day as Ventura County Volunteer of the Year is packed with fond memories for Rosemary. Topping her list was being honored alongside six others that included
    Philanthropists of the Year. Jackie Inskeep of Santa Barbara County and Barbara Meister of Ventura County; Santa Barbara County- Volunteer of the Year. Tresha Sell; Professional Fundraiser of the Year, Stephen Wheatly, and Youth Philanthropists of the Year, Katy Villanueva of Santa Barbara and Dedria Brunett from Ventura County.
    Rosemary was particularly moved by youth honoree Brunett who credits Casa Pacifica for giving her a second chance at life. After recalling Brunett's story and her impressive commitment to make a difference for others, Rosemary went on to say 'it has always been very important to set an example for my own children I have been very fortunate in this life - actions speak louder than words so I want to make sure this world is a better place because of the opportunities I have had and show them the world can be a better place because they were here too,'

    Not surprisingly Rosemary was overwhelmed by the letters of support that were written on her behalf and the proclamation presented to her by the Ventura County Board of Supervisors recognizing her accomplishments. Not one to rest on her laurels, she is already thinking ahead to next year's Gala for the American Cancer Society scheduled to take place August 6th and considering her options for making an even bigger impact on behalf of others in 2011.
    According to Rosemary, her motivation each day comes from her desire to 'give back to the world' and to live up to the 'golden rule' or what she refers to as her 'family credo of doing unto others as you would have them do unto you.'
  • DOUGLAS Mac ARTHUR
    Posted on: 2011-02-09
    Santa Rosa Valley Resident and Veteran Actor Gary Saderup motion picture is being released on DVD February 22nd! Gary helped produce and was the lead actor in this movie. Go to this link to order from Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Douglas-MacArthur-Corregidor-Gary-Saderup/dp/B004FPE4JE/ref=lh_ni_t_

    Northwest Indie Review

    Opinionated, bold, stubborn, loyal, the consummate soldier, a man whose vision was ahead of his time, a man whose values were as American as West Point, Douglas MacArthur was a key figure in the mid 20th century. As portrayed by Gary Saderup, it is as though he lives again!

    Veteran actor Gary Saderup has appeared on the Shakespearean stage as Macbeth, Othello and Richard the Third. He has worked with American author Ray Bradbury in creating the leading roles in two original plays. Historical characters are not new to him. He played John Barrymore in 'I Hate Hamlet.' More recently Mr. Saderup appeared as Charles Darwin with actor Patrick Warburton in the hit British play 'Darwin in Malibu'.

    In the film adaptation of Steven Rivera's brilliant script 'Douglas MacArthur: Return to Corregidor' Gary Saderup brings his acting prowess to bear in creating a sensitive portrait of the legendary American general.

  • Santa Rosa Park Equestrian Center Update
    Posted on: 2011-01-05
    The effort to build an equestrian center in the Santa Rosa Valley advanced this week, but financing is still in doubt.

    The project at Santa Rosa Valley Park has been stalled for years in the face of environmental and financial objections from Thousand Oaks City Council members, who control land required for a trail.

    But at its Tuesday meeting December 14th, the City of Thousand Oaks council authorized managers to try to reach an agreement with county officials within two months.

    “I think it’s doable,” city Public Works Director Mark Watkins said Wednesday.

    The council essentially granted the easement for the trail if city staff’s concerns can be resolved, Watkins said.

    He said the chief issue is the cost of widening Hill Canyon Road, which runs past the park and up to the city’s wastewater treatment plant.

    Construction of the equestrian center hinges on the trail because an environmental review requires it for safe passage of horses from the intersection of Santa Rosa Road and Yucca Drive

    Watkins had no current estimate for the cost of the widening project, nor did Paul Grossgold, director of the county General Services Agency. But the two intend to begin discussions Friday over a potential deal.

    Grossgold said the county was willing to share the cost of the widening project in 2007, but no longer has the money. After the City Council passed on a deal that year, the county installed a picnic area and built turnouts on the narrow road, he said.

    “We had grant funding that was going to expire,” Grossgold said.

    Then six months ago, the county Board of Supervisors put up $238,000 to show Thousand Oaks it could afford to build the center.

    Supervisor Linda Parks, who represents both Thousand Oaks and the rural valley, pushed for the money. She could not be reached for comment after the council vote.

    The City Council voted 4-1 to authorize the negotiations, with Councilman Dennis Gillette dissenting.

    Mark Burley:
    I'd like the thank the Thousand Oaks City Council for its recent vote to allow an easement over its property in Santa Rosa Valley subject to staffs from the city and county working out an agreement for the final details. This is a large step forward in finalizing Santa Rosa Park.

    The council members were very positive in their support for the completion of this park. I'm hoping this can be the start of a new era of increased cooperation between elected officials from the city and the county. Both have current and future projects that rely on continuing a pragmatic dialogue.

    It is truly the season of good will!

    - Mark Burley,

    Rosemary Allison:
    The large contingent of residents from both the City of Thousand Oaks and Santa Rosa Valley that showed up at the City of Thousand Oaks Council in favor of the finalization of this long awaited park is testament to the goodwill this project fosters. It is wonderful to see the elected officials of our community joining together to support projects that benefit the entire County. It was gratifying to hear from Scott Mitnick that his staff has already coordinated with the County Staff and that in his opinion all of the outstanding issues for the finalization of the park can be resolved very easily and quickly.
    ..




  • Cleaning and Organizazing Services
    Posted on: 2010-10-07

    My name is Pamela and I have my own bussines of Cleaning & Organizing services, I have more then 15 years in the cleaning services, very good references in the area of Santa Rosa Valley , please feel free to contact me. I can demostrate my excelent and impeccable work.
    $20 OFF FIRST CLEANING
  • Santa Rosa Valley Resident Opens Chicago Style Ribs Restaurant
    Posted on: 2010-09-08
    Special Coupon Offer See Attached!
    FREE APPETIZER Free
    Onion Ring Appetizer
    with purchase of
    any entree
    FREE LUNCH FREE DINNER
    buy 1 Lunch & two
    beverages & receive the
    2nd Lunch FREE*
    buy 1 Dinner & two
    beverages & receive the
    2nd Dinner FREE*
    692 East Main Street ~ Ventura
    Call the Rib Hotline yet? 805-641-0812
    Lunch • Dinner • Cocktails • Takeout • Delivery • Catering
  • Santa Rosa Valley 2010 Car Show Results
    Posted on: 2010-09-06
    Viewers Choice Steve Fusci 1971 GTO Pontiac
    Drivers Ballot Top 10 Cars in Show (listed in order of most votes)
    1. Darrel Shea 1947 Chrysler Town & Country Sedan (woody)
    2. Dale Conover 1957 Chevy Nomad
    3. Christian Hurtado 1954 Lincoln Capri
    4. Mike & Bo Snow 1948 Jaguar Mark IV
    5. Don & Phu 1965 Honda Dream Motorcycle
    6. David & Marci David 1946 Hudson
    7. Jeff Gean 1929 Ford Pick Up
    8. Gary & Junie Cooper 1947 Triumph 1800
    9. Lori Johnson 1923 Studebaker
    10. Evevette Giebler 1093 VW with Camper trailer

    Best car of show Dr. Roger Leir 1948 Dodge Derham
    Best Motorcycle of Show Don Madden 1060 Matchless
    Go to Neighborhood Photos to see photos of the winning cars!
  • Foster Homes Needed fo Shelter Dogs
    Posted on: 2010-07-23
    P.A.P.A., Promote And Protect Animals is a consortium of local animal advocates dedicated to converting the Ventura County shelter in Camarillo to 'no kill' status...e.g. no killing adoptable pets for space. To accomplish this goal, we need temporary foster homes for dogs. We pull them from the shelter the day before they are scheduled to be killed, and then either transport them to safety or find them local adoptive homes. Between the day they are saved and the date of adoption or transport, they need foster homes. Without interim housing, we can only save dogs on the date we know we have transport available...so many dogs are killed that we could have saved if we had a place for them to go short term. Many properties in the Santa Rosa Valley are large enough to handle multiple dogs and there are many animal lovers in our community....a perfect match! We also need barns or storage buildings where spayed/neutered feral cats can be released to do what they do!!! Please visit our web site for more iinformation and for ways you can help change our local shelter so that it becomes a place of safety for the animals it is supposed to serve.
  • American Cancer Society Gala Huge Success!
    Posted on: 2010-07-14
    Over 300 guests enjoyed the American Cancer Gala 2010! This spectacular evening not only celebrated life but also help us create more birthdays!

    It was a privilege to stand as chair of the Joie de Vivre—Evening of Hope Gala, 2010. THE PRELIMINARY total of funds raised at this event was $213,491!!!!!
    The Live Auction and Cancer Challenge was the highest EVER raised in this State!!!!. “With cancer affecting virtually every family in Ventura County, this is one battle that crosses all societal and political boundaries, and I am so delighted with the overwhelming response to this event.”
    I want to extend my heartfelt gratitude to our hosts, Jim and Cindy Hawse for offering their glorious home for this extraordinary event. As we embraced the festive ambiance of the French countryside, cuisine, and the exciting auctions, we did so knowing that we were contributing our part, standing with those doctors, researchers and care givers, who dedicate their lives to keeping our loved ones out of harms way.

    The success of this year's American Cancer Society Evening of Hope Gala 2010 is a true testament to the philanthropic support of the community and individuals who are committed to making a difference in the fight against cancer. To the dynamic volunteer committee that gave countless hours of preparation ensuring the success of this stunning event, I give a breathtaking salute! I was thrilled to have had the opportunity to chair such a wonderful and inspiring celebration that will have a direct impact on the lives of cancer patients and caregivers.

    And now my friends, Profitez et que Dieu benisse! Enjoy and God Bless!

    Sincerely,
    Rosemary Allison

    Sponsors of the 2010 Joie de Vivre - Evening of Hope Gala

    Jim and Cindy Hawse - Amgen - Kim Brown Blake -Rosemary Allison - Opolo Wines -Sysco Foods - Vista Automotive Family - Mission Produce -Ventura County Health Care Agency - Alister A. George, M.D., Digestive Health Center - Renee and Eric Weider - Radiation Oncology of Ventura County - First California Bank - Cabrillo Radiation Oncology Center - North Oaks Radiation Oncology Center -Westlake Radiation Oncology Center - Simi Valley Radiation Oncology Center - Pueblo Radiology -David Weissmann - Marsha and Steve Hively - Sam and Mona Hosseini - Santa Barbara Bank & Trust - Peggy and Alan Ludington - The Law Office of Rod C. Reynolds - Viking Life Insurance Agency, LLC -Ventura County Hematology-Oncology Specialists - Dr. and Mrs. John Stahlberg -Palms Imaging - Supervisor Kathy Long - Tom Staben Cisco’s Catering - Los Robles Medical Center - California Lutheran University - Ventura County Star - Community Memorial Hospital -Ventura Rentals-Jim Allison - Rosemary Allison -St. Johns Regional Medical Center –Ventura Investment Co.- Fidelity National Title Insurance - Marsha Hively –Barbara Eichberger - City of Thousand Oaks

  • Mountain Lion is Spotted in Santa Rosa Valley July 2010
    Posted on: 2010-07-14
    A mountain lion was reported seen in Santa Rosa Valley in the vicinity of Presilla and Escollera. No loss of animals reported in Santa Rosa Valley. Keep a look out and be careful when jogging or running in the early morning or dusk hours. Please make sure that small children are not alone on the trails. Just beware and be smart!

    Although we have not been notified of any incidents, I did get this email from another Santa Rosa Valley resident:
    Just wanted to give you a heads up....the mountain lion has attacked in the last few weeks in Moorpark. My understanding is it has killed some dogs and 2 Alpaca's in the last few weeks. Maybe you can make some calls to verify. Just wanted to let you know, did'nt know if you had heard anything.....so if you want to put it on your blog to warn all do so. Remember it was last 4th of July that this thing attacked our area first.

    If anyone has further information, please email me and I will keep everyone notified. The SantaRosaValley Blog will still contain ongoing information!
  • RATTLESNAKE WARNINGS!
    Posted on: 2010-07-08
    It seems as if it is too soon, but 2 dogs and one resident was reported to have been bitten by rattlesnakes in the last 3 weeks. One resident found a rattlesnake coiled under their trash can. Thousands of dollars has been spent at the vets for rattlesnake bite treatment to animals already this year! According to the emergency pet clinic this has been the worst year in the last 6 years of rattlesnake bites!

    Reminder that many residents have been satisfied with the services of: Bo Slyapich
    The Rattlesnake Wrangler
    818-880-4269 (home)
    818-383-0476 (cell)
    Bo will travel to any area that needs him. Response time depends on traffic and location. Available 24 hours, 7 days a week.
    RATTLESNAKES in California
    As springtime calls people and snakes alike to the outdoors, encounters with snakes become inevitable. California has a variety of snakes, most of which are benign. The exception is California’s only native venomous snake - the rattlesnake.

    California rattlesnake species include the northern Pacific rattlesnake (in northern California), and the Western Diamondback, Sidewinder, Speckled rattlesnake, Red Diamond rattlesnake, Southern Pacific, Great Basin rattlesnake and the Mojave rattlesnake (all found in Southern California). Though rattlesnakes are dangerous if provoked, they also provide humans with a tremendous service ? they eat rodents, other reptiles, and insects, and are in turn eaten by other predators. In California where rattlesnakes are found from sea level to the inland prairies and desert areas and to the mountains at elevations of more than 10,000 feet, enjoying the outdoors means learning how to avoid contact with rattlesnakes.

    Generally not aggressive, rattlesnakes strike when threatened or deliberately provoked, but given room they will retreat. Most snake bites occur when a rattlesnake is handled or accidentally touched by someone walking or climbing. The majority of snakebites occur on the hands, feet and ankles.

    Rattlesnakes can cause serious injury to humans on rare occasions. The California Poison Control Center notes that rattlesnakes account for more than 800 bites each year with one to two deaths. Most bites occur between the months of April and October when snakes and humans are most active outdoors. About 25 percent of the bites are “dry,” meaning no venom was injected, but the bites still require medical treatment.

    The potential of running into a rattlesnake should not deter anyone from venturing outdoors, but there are several precautions that can be taken to lessen the chance of being bitten when out in snake country - which is just about anywhere in California.

    The dos and don’ts in snake country:

    First, know that rattlesnakes are not confined to rural areas. They have been found near urban areas, in river or lakeside parks, and at golf courses. Be aware that startled rattlesnakes may not rattle before striking defensively. There are several safety measures that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of startling a rattlesnake.

    • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when walking through wild areas. Wear hiking boots.

    • When hiking, stick to well-used trails and wear over-the-ankle boots and loose-fitting long pants. Avoid tall grass, weeds and heavy underbrush where snakes may hide during the day.

    • Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see, and avoid wandering around in the dark. Step ON logs and rocks, never over them, and be especially careful when climbing rocks or gathering firewood. Check out stumps or logs before sitting down, and shake out sleeping bags before use.

    • Never grab “sticks” or “branches” while swimming in lakes and rivers. Rattlesnakes can swim.

    • Be careful when stepping over the doorstep as well. Snakes like to crawl along the edge of buildings where they are protected on one side.

    • Never hike alone. Always have someone with you who can assist in an emergency.

    • Do not handle a freshly killed snake, it can still inject venom.

    • Teach children early to respect snakes and to leave them alone. Children are naturally curious and will pick up snakes.

    Is it a rattlesnake?

    Many a useful and non-threatening snake has suffered a quick death from a frantic human who has mistakenly identified a gopher snake, garter, racer or other as a rattlesnake. This usually happens when a snake assumes an instinctual defensive position used to bluff adversaries. A gopher snake has the added unfortunate trait of imitating a rattlesnake by flattening its head and body, vibrating its tail, hissing and actually striking if approached too closely.

    A rattlesnake is a heavy-bodied, blunt-tailed snake with one or more rattles on the tail. It has a triangular-shaped head, much broader at the back than at the front, and a distinct “neck” region. The rattlesnake also has openings between the nostrils and eyes, which is a heat-sensing pit. The eyes are hooded with elliptical pupils. Additional identifying characteristics include a series of dark and light bands near the tail, just before the rattles which are different from the markings on the rest of the body. Also note that rattles may not always be present, as they are often lost through breakage and are not always developed on the young.

    Keeping snakes out of the yard

    The best protection against rattlesnakes in the yard is a “rattlesnake proof” fence. It can be expensive and requires maintenance, however. The fence should either be solid or with mesh no larger than one-quarter inch. It should be at least three feet high with the bottom buried a few inches in the ground. Slanting your snake fence outward about a 30-degree angle will help. Vegetation should be kept away from the fence since the snake could crawl to the top of an adjacent tree or shrub. Discourage snakes by removing piles of boards or rocks around the home. Use caution when removing those piles - there may already be a snake there. Encouraging and protecting natural competitors like gopher snakes, kingsnakes and racers will reduce the rattlesnake population in the immediate area. And, kingsnakes actually kill and eat rattlesnakes.

    What to do in the event of a snake bite

    Though uncommon, rattlesnake bites do occur, so have a plan in place for responding to any situation. Carry a portable phone, hike with a companion who can assist in an emergency, and make sure that family or friends know where you are going and when you will be checking in.

    The first thing to do if bitten is to stay calm. Generally, the most serious effect of a rattlesnake bite to an adult is local tissue damage which needs to be treated. Children, because they are smaller, are in more danger if they are bitten.

    Get to a doctor as soon as possible, but stay calm. Frenetic, high-speed driving places the victim at greater risk of an accident and increased heart rate. If the doctor is more than 30 minutes away, keep the bite below the heart, and then try to get to the doctor as quickly as possible.

    The California Poison Control Center advises:

    Stay calm
    Wash the bite area gently with soap and water
    Remove watches, rings, etc, which may constrict swelling
    Immobilize the affected area
    Transport safely to the nearest medical facility
  • Save the Date August 6, 2011 Bugatti Ball
    Posted on: 2010-05-12
    Dear Friends,

    Along with more than 300 guests from around Ventura County, you are invited to celebrate at the Bugatti Ball at the Mullin Automotive Museum – while we raise funds for patient services and cancer research.

    Since 1913 when it was founded as The American Society for the Control of Cancer (ASCC) in New York City, the American Cancer Society has been on the forefront in the field of voluntary health organizations. Its founding mission to turn the cancer diagnosis from a frightened and hushed whisper to a loud and thunderous public fight was embraced by doctors, nurses, business and society leaders; these men and women knew that this adversary would have to be bravely and openly confronted by a unified and informed community for it to be eradicated from our midst. From those resolute beginnings came a wave of decisive steps over the years in education, research, outreach and free medical services for people and families with cancer. Each step, a Rubicon of progress, has resulted in more than $3.3 billion committed to cancer research that has funded 42 Nobel Prize winners by the American Cancer Society and given aid and medical attention to millions. **
    And though we are planning to embrace the festive ambiance of the exotic automobiles, cuisine, and exciting auction, we will do so to contribute our part and stand with those doctors, researchers and care givers, who dedicate their lives to keeping our loved ones out of harms way. Though we know the battle is not over, on August 6th in Ventura, California we will stand together; and raise our glasses in friendship to celebrate the Bugatti Ball and to cheer in triumph the eleven million cancer survivors who celebrate their birthdays this year.
    In the words of the ineffable Margaret Thatcher, You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it. In dedicating our enduring, fighting spirit to this cause we will help millions of people live to see the sun rise on their lives anew. To the many who have worked to bring this special event to fruitiion, I extend my deepest appreciation; in so doing we will come together vigilant to insure the success of yet another opportunity to raise funds and awareness with the hope of saving lives. And to those of you who will commit to joining us as respected guests, thank you for your kindness and generosity—you are the reason this wonderful, successful event will bring hope to so many.


    Please join us in making a difference in the lives of thousands living with cancer, their families and the health professionals who support them. Enjoy a spectacular evening that will celebrate life – and create more birthdays!


    Note: We have some incredible auction items, but as our goals are high, more are needed. Please take a moment to contemplate what items, gift cards, or services that you can offer that could be auctioned off. (i.e. restaurant gift cards, time share weeks, golf at your country club, trips, airline tickets or vouchers, credit card points).


  • Santa Rosa Valley Tractor Party a Success! Tree Planting Day May 8th
    Posted on: 2010-04-13
    In the 'call it a party' and they'll come category, Saturday April 3rd six hard working volunteers showed up with their tractors to mow weeds at Santa Rosa Park in preparation for the May 8th volunteer tree planting. Can you say Tractor Party? We all appreciate the time that Dave Boyle, John Johs, Joe Markiewicz, Kimme Black... , Shane Blaser, Mark Burley, Janet Wall, Rosemary Allison, Dr. Marwood Stout and Tom and Diane Wade took from their day to join us. Special appreciation to Jerry Jones, owner of Environmental Landscpae for the offer of mulch and the loan of their tractor today!Thanks to Supervisor Parks for getting the County to provide the irrigation for the trees that this tractor party was preparing for. Santa Rosa Valley Trails Inc. (SRVTrails.com) was pleased to be able to help by sponsoring this tractor work, And thanks to Linda's administrative assistant, Janet Wall, for getting the trees donated. And finally a big thank you to Marwood Stout and the Church of Latter Day Saints whose offer to volunteer to plant the trees started this whole community effort. Join us at the park on Saturday May 8th when the LDS volunteers plant the trees. Community Spirit at it's finest!
  • What to do in case of an earthquake - Red Cross tips.
    Posted on: 2010-04-12
    Are you at increased risk from earthquakes? • Contact your local emergency management office, local American Red Cross chapter, state geological survey or department of natural resources. •. • Buildings with foundations resting on landfill and other unstable soils are at increased risk of damage. Did you know? Doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure. During an earthquake, get under a sturdy piece of furniture and hold on. This will provide some protection from falling objects that can injure you during an earthquake. ❐ Become aware of fire evacuation and earthquake plans for all of the buildings you occupy regularly. ❐ Pick safe places in each room of your home, workplace and/or school. A safe place could be under a piece of furniture or against an interior wall away from windows, bookcases or tall furniture that could fall on you. ❐ Practice drop, cover and hold on in each safe place. If you do not have sturdy furniture to hold on to, sit on the floor next to an interior wall and cover your head and neck with your arms. ❐ Keep a flashlight and sturdy shoes by each person’s bed. ❐ Bolt and brace water heaters and gas appliances to wall studs. ❐ Bolt bookcases, china cabinets and other tall furniture to wall studs. ❐ Hang heavy items, such as pictures and mirrors, away from beds, couches and anywhere people sleep or sit. ❐ Brace overhead light fixtures. ❐ Install strong latches or bolts on cabinets. Large or heavy items should be closest to the floor. ❐ Learn how to shut off the gas valves in your home and keep a wrench handy for that purpose. ❐ Keep and maintain an emergency supplies kit in an easy-to-access location. If you are inside when the shaking starts … ❐ Drop, cover and hold on. Move as little as possible. ❐ If you are in bed, stay there, curl up and hold on. Protect your head with a pillow. ❐ Stay away from windows to avoid being injured by shattered glass. ❐ Stay indoors until the shaking stops and you are sure it is safe to exit. If you must leave the building after the shaking stops, use stairs rather than an elevator in case there are aftershocks, power outages or other damage. ❐ Be aware that fire alarms and sprinkler systems frequently go off in buildings during an earthquake, even if there is no fire. If you are outside when the shaking starts … ❐ Find a clear spot and drop to the ground. Stay there until the shaking stops (away from buildings, power lines, trees, streetlights). ❐ If you are in a vehicle, pull over to a clear location and stop. Avoid bridges, overpasses and power lines if possible. Stay inside with your seatbelt fastened until the shaking stops. Then, drive carefully, avoiding bridges and ramps that may have been damaged. ❐ If a power line falls on your vehicle, do not get out. Wait for assistance. ❐ If you are in a mountainous area or near unstable slopes or cliffs, be alert for falling rocks and other debris. Landslides are often triggered by earthquakes. Let Your Family Know You’re Safe If your community experiences an earthquake, or any disaster, register on the American Red Cross Safe and Well Web site available through RedCross.org to let your family and friends know about your welfare. If you don’t have Internet access, call 1-866-GET-INFO to register yourself and your family.
    Be RedCrossReady How can I prepare? What should I do during an earthquake? What do I do after an earthquake? An earthquake is a sudden, rapid shaking of the earth caused by the breaking and shifting of rock beneath the earth’s surface. Earthquakes strike suddenly, without warning, and they can occur at any time of the year, day or night. Forty-five states and territories in the United States are at moderate to very high risk of earthquakes, and they are located in every region of the country. For more information on disaster and emergency preparedness, visit RedCross.org.
    ❐ After an earthquake, the disaster may continue. Expect and prepare for potential aftershocks, landslides or even a tsunami. Tsunamis are often generated by earthquakes. ❐ Each time you feel an aftershock, drop, cover and hold on. Aftershocks frequently occur minutes, days, weeks and even months following an earthquake. ❐ Check yourself for injuries and get first aid, if necessary, before helping injured or trapped persons. ❐ Put on long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy shoes and work gloves to protect against injury from broken objects. ❐ Look quickly for damage in and around your home and get everyone out if your home is unsafe. ❐ Listen to a portable, battery-operated or hand-crank radio for updated emergency information and instructions. ❐ Check the telephones in your home or workplace to see if you can get a dial tone. Make brief calls to report life-threatening emergencies. ❐ Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is the most common hazard after an earthquake. ❐ Clean up spilled medications, bleach, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. ❐ Open closet and cabinet doors carefully as contents may have shifted. ❐ Help people who require special assistance, such as infants, children and the elderly or disabled. ❐ Watch out for fallen power lines or broken gas lines and stay out of damaged areas. ❐ Keep animals under your direct control. ❐ Stay out of damaged buildings. ❐ If you were away from home, return only when authorities say it is safe to do so. Use extreme caution and examine walls, floors, doors, staircases and windows to check for damage. ❐ Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.
  • HAVE A RADIO? WANT TO PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY DISASTER PLAN?
    Posted on: 2010-04-12
    The SANTA ROSA VALLEY - EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK radio operators headed by Santa Rosa Valley resident Jim Fortney, have the capability to communicate with the Ventura County Office of Emergency Services and local emergency responders if normal communication channels become inoperative. Our training has indicated that in the event of a major disaster both land-line and mobile/cell telephone service will be not be available and the ability to communicate with residents by radio will be crucial.
    COMMUNICATION:
    The Santa Rosa Valley CERT Team; Santa Rosa Valley Neighborhood Watch and Santa Rosa Valley CERT Team coordinator is working in concert with the SANTA ROSA VALLEY - EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK (SRV-ERN) to establish a string of amateur radio operators and hand held un-licensed radio services to link everyone who wishes to participate into an integrated network. If you have a radio and are interested in joining the CERT team or the Emergency Radio Network please email Rosemary Allison @ rosemaryallison@aol.com for further information on whom to contact, when and how to join these groups.
  • SANTA ROSA VALLEY COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) UPDATE
    Posted on: 2010-04-12
    Following a major disaster, first responders who provide fire and medical services will not be able to meet the demand for these services. Factors as number of victims, communication failures, and road blockages will prevent people from accessing emergency services they have come to expect at a moment's notice through 911. People will have to rely on each other for help in order to meet their immediate life saving and life sustaining needs.
    One also expects that under these kinds of conditions, family members, and neighbors will spontaneously try to help each other.
    If we can predict that emergency services will not meet immediate needs following a major disaster, especially if there is no warning as in an earthquake, and people will spontaneously volunteer, what can the residents of Santa Rosa Valley do to prepare ourselves for this eventuality?
    First, present citizens the facts about what to expect following a major disaster in terms of immediate services.
    Second, give the message about their responsibility for mitigation and preparedness.
    Third, train a CERT team in needed life saving skills with emphasis on decision making skills, rescuer safety, and doing the greatest good for the greatest number.
    Fourth, organize teams so that they are an extension of first responder services offering immediate help to victims until professional services arrive.
    The SANTA ROSA VALLEY - EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK radio operators headed by Santa Rosa Valley resident Jim Fortney, have the capability to communicate with the Ventura County Office of Emergency Services and local emergency responders if normal communication channels become inoperative. Our training has indicated that in the event of a major disaster both land-line and mobile/cell telephone service will be not be available and the ability to communicate with residents by radio will be crucial.
    COMMUNICATION:
    To further these goals, the Santa Rosa Valley CERT Team; Santa Rosa Valley Neighborhood Watch and Santa Rosa Valley CERT Team coordinator is working in concert with the SANTA ROSA VALLEY - EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK (SRV-ERN) to establish a string of amateur radio operators and hand held un-licensed radio services to link everyone who wishes to participate into an integrated network. If you have a radio and are interested in joining the CERT team or the Emergency Radio Network please email Rosemary Allison @ rosemaryallison@aol.com for further information on whom to contact, when and how to join these groups.
  • American Cancer Society Gala in Santa Rosa Valley August 1st
    Posted on: 2010-03-10
    I have been asked to chair an event with a wonderful group of dedicated American Cancer Society volunteers to create a special occasion with an important purpose – and I can’t wait to tell you about it! Support the
    community work and scientific research of the American Cancer Society by joining me at Ventura County’s second annual American Cancer Society gala. This year’s theme is Joire de Vivre, Evening of Hope 2010. This event is an opportunity to make a difference in the health of our community. It is a chance to join the American Cancer Society in the fight against cancer.
    Plans are underway to transform a villa in Santa Rosa Valley into an inviting corner of the French Countryside. You won’t want to miss this event! Beginning with a poolside reception, the evening will include a
    meal of signature dishes prepared by some of our finest local chefs,
    silent and live auction, and capped off with dancing under the stars! Invitations and other details will be available soon, but we are looking for sponsorships and auction items.
    For more than 90 years American Cancer Society has been fighting to eliminate cancer, save lives and diminish suffering through research, education, advocacy, and service. Despite many successes and even with the many, many lives saved there is still so much to do. It is because of generous support through events like Joire de Vivre, Evening of Hope 2010 that national research and local programs continue to be funded.
    Please remember that together we truly can make Ventura County a healthier place for our family, friends, and neighbors.
    Rosemary Allison - 2010 Joire de Vivre Evening of Hope Event Chair
  • Santa Rosa Equestrian Park Tree Beautification Project
    Posted on: 2010-01-31
    Supervisor Parks' informed the MAC at the January 21, 2010 SRV MAC meeting that a very large group of volunteers from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints has chosen Saturday, May 8, 2010 to plant trees at Santa Rosa Equestrian Park. This same group of volunteers planted 300 oak, crepe myrtle and redbud trees ($5,000 worth) in the Thousand Oaks area on April 25, 2009. The Santa Rosa Valley community is encouraged to donate funds to help purchase trees for this worthy project.

    Please contact Janet Wall in Supervisor Parks' office (Janet.Wall@ventura.org) if you would like to donate to this worthwhile project!
  • Great Restaurant Jonathan's at Peirano's Restaurant and J's Tapas
    Posted on: 2010-01-31
    Check out gourmet restaurant owned by Santa Rosa Valley residents - Mike and Sanaa Dugan!
    Special menu for Saints and Colts fans who come to watch the Super Bowl in the bar (see virtual tour). For Valentine's Day there is a special prix fix menu which features my favorite salmon dish.http://www.jonathansatpeiranos.com/events.aspReservations can be made online.Jonathan's at Peirano's Restaurant and J's Tapas - Special Events and News
    www.jonathansatpeiranos.com
    Special events and news at Jonathan's at Peirano's Restaurant,a gourmet restaraunt serving fine mediterranean food and an extensive wine list, located in historic Ventura, California.
  • Mountain Lion update
    Posted on: 2009-10-06
    October 4, 2009 Sunday
    Approximately 4:30 PM: Wildwood Ranch neighborhood a 9 year old Jack Russell Terrier was found killed in the Torres backyard. The Torres family lives across the street from me on Sumac Lane. The family returned home at 4:30 pm and when the children went into their backyard they found their dog had been killed, BUT the dog had not been eviscerated. There were puncture wounds on the neck and the skin had been removed through the center (it looked as if the dog had a “saddle” on both sides). They assumed that their dog had been killed the night before. They gently placed a sheet over the dog and left it in place per the instructions.

    Lynn Scheck came to the home at approximately 5:09 PM. She called and left a message for Leo the lion tracker and took photos of the kill. Lynn thought the carcass did not look like a mountain lion kill because the innards had not been eviscerated. She took her camera back to her home so that she could send them to Leo for his opinion.

    Carmela was on the telephone speaking with Giselle Yeatman, a neighbor two doors away and looking out her back window when she saw the mountain lion just beyond her back fence. She told her husband who had reservations that she had actually seen a mountain lion in daylight. He went outside and walked to the back area of his yard where the dog was still laying. He looked beyond his fence and saw the mountain lion about 40 yards away. The mountain lion looked directly at him and then turned to walk away slowly. Oscar saw the curl of the lions tail as it turned to walk away.

    At that point everyone realized that the cat had been interrupted and did not get a chance to finish the meal. We were all surprised because we were used to the usual “dusk to dawn” time periods and did not expect that a pet would be killed in the late afternoon. It was coming back to finish it’s meal!!!

    Fish and Game came to the residence at approximately 8:30 pm. The two Fish and Game wardens surveyed the bite marks in the neck and confirmed that a mountain lion had killed their dog and issued a depradation permit. Once the permit was in place, Leo Fisher was officially “hired” to come to try to track down the cat with his dogs. Leo arrived at about 11:00 pm. He and one game warden proceeded to investigate the scene. Leo placed a tracker collar on the dead dog; so that if the lion returned and left with the dog they could track him easier. Leo and the Fish and Game Warden obtained permission from all the adjoining neighbors to utilize their properties to search for the cat. They positioned themselves to catch the cat if he came back to get the dog. When the cat did not return they proceeded to walk with the hunting dogs up and around many of the trails in the back. They saw no sign of the cat. What they did see was a lot of coyotes – and Leo expressed concern as these coyotes did not show any signs of fear when he and the other warden came through with the dogs. The coyotes were trying to bait the dogs and stayed close to them.

    Monday October 5, 2009

    The next morning Leo said that although they had gone up and down most of the hills he did not see any signs of the cat. At 10:30 am Monday morning Leo left. Leo felt that since his dogs did not pick up the scent of the cat that it might not return and it could have been spooked away from this area for awhile. All we can do is keep our eyes and ears open. Be attentive to the sounds of your animals and try to only walk on the trails in groups.

    Leo is tentatively scheduled to return next week. He is also available for hire to kill coyotes that are problems to your pets and neighborhoods. Please contact me if you want to schedule to meet with him regarding a coyote problem in your yard. There have been numerous attacks on pets in the last 3 months by coyotes, some in the presence of their owners.
  • Law Offices of GREEN & CAMPBELL, LLP Loan Modifications
    Posted on: 2009-07-23
    Things Your Lenders and Creditors May Not Tell You

    If the value of your home has dropped so that you owe more on the mortgage than the house is worth, there are many options you may take advantage of to: (1) stop the foreclosure process; (2) modify your loan terms; (3) reduce your monthly payments; and (4) save your home. If the foreclosure clock has started because your lender has given you a Notice of Default, get immediate legal advice to determine and evaluate your rights and options before the bank foreclosures on your home and evicts you from the property.

    A Chapter 13 Bankruptcy may allow you to keep your home by (1) preventing your lender from foreclosing; (2) requesting the bankruptcy judge to remove 2nd and 3rd loans from your property; (3) giving you time to negotiate with your 1st trust deed lender for new loan terms; (4) reducing your outstanding debts; and (5) increasing your ability to make your mortgage payments.
    Debt Settlement is an alternative to bankruptcy. Many unsecured lenders, including credit card companies, doctors and medical service providers will agree to reduce the principal amount of your debts to help you avoid bankruptcy.
    Free Consultation. The attorneys at Green & Campbell are dedicated to maintaining high ethical standards, and fighting for our clients. If you would like additional information about your legal options, please give me a call or send me an email to schedule a free no obligation consultation or to make a reservation for one of our community seminars.

    Scott Green, Esq.
    Managing Partner
    Loan Modification Department Bankruptcy Department
    (805) 306-1100, extension 14
    Email: scott@gdclawyers.com
  • Santa Rosa Valley Community Spirit Awards
    Posted on: 2009-07-05
    Presented by Supervisor Linda Parks on behalf of the Ventura County Board of Supervisors:

    In recognition for working in partnership with Santa Rosa Valley residents, the Municipal Advisory Council and Ventura County Staff to successfully complete the traffic signal synchronization project on Santa Rosa Road and for going the extra mile by demonstrating an acute responsiveness to public safety. Thereby contributing to the Santa Rosa Valley Community Spirit.

    Recipients:

    Kevin Cannon – Santa Rosa resident and Community Laison with the Department of Public Works

    Rosemary Allison

    Don Shubert

    Ruth Means

    Janis Gardner

    Mark Burley

    Officer Randy Hosking

    Officer David Kajiwara

    Cptn. Cliff Williams

    Ann Freauf

    Ron Means

    Gussie Woodfill

    Gene West

    Al Adam

    Ray Cogswell

    Kim Pagano

    Carole Hunter

    Paul Bonds

    Jean Berganstal

    Eric Gardner

    Jim Allison

    Max Bowers

    Bonnie Matley

    Elsie Cogswell
  • RATTLESNAKES in California
    Posted on: 2009-05-15
    RATTLESNAKES in California
    As springtime calls people and snakes alike to the outdoors, encounters with snakes become inevitable. California has a variety of snakes, most of which are benign. The exception is California’s only native venomous snake - the rattlesnake.

    California rattlesnake species include the northern Pacific rattlesnake (in northern California), and the Western Diamondback, Sidewinder, Speckled rattlesnake, Red Diamond rattlesnake, Southern Pacific, Great Basin rattlesnake and the Mojave rattlesnake (all found in Southern California). Though rattlesnakes are dangerous if provoked, they also provide humans with a tremendous service ? they eat rodents, other reptiles, and insects, and are in turn eaten by other predators. In California where rattlesnakes are found from sea level to the inland prairies and desert areas and to the mountains at elevations of more than 10,000 feet, enjoying the outdoors means learning how to avoid contact with rattlesnakes.

    Generally not aggressive, rattlesnakes strike when threatened or deliberately provoked, but given room they will retreat. Most snake bites occur when a rattlesnake is handled or accidentally touched by someone walking or climbing. The majority of snakebites occur on the hands, feet and ankles.

    Rattlesnakes can cause serious injury to humans on rare occasions. The California Poison Control Center notes that rattlesnakes account for more than 800 bites each year with one to two deaths. Most bites occur between the months of April and October when snakes and humans are most active outdoors. About 25 percent of the bites are “dry,” meaning no venom was injected, but the bites still require medical treatment.

    The potential of running into a rattlesnake should not deter anyone from venturing outdoors, but there are several precautions that can be taken to lessen the chance of being bitten when out in snake country - which is just about anywhere in California.

    The dos and don’ts in snake country:

    First, know that rattlesnakes are not confined to rural areas. They have been found near urban areas, in river or lakeside parks, and at golf courses. Be aware that startled rattlesnakes may not rattle before striking defensively. There are several safety measures that can be taken to reduce the likelihood of startling a rattlesnake.

    • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when walking through wild areas. Wear hiking boots.

    • When hiking, stick to well-used trails and wear over-the-ankle boots and loose-fitting long pants. Avoid tall grass, weeds and heavy underbrush where snakes may hide during the day.

    • Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see, and avoid wandering around in the dark. Step ON logs and rocks, never over them, and be especially careful when climbing rocks or gathering firewood. Check out stumps or logs before sitting down, and shake out sleeping bags before use.

    • Never grab “sticks” or “branches” while swimming in lakes and rivers. Rattlesnakes can swim.

    • Be careful when stepping over the doorstep as well. Snakes like to crawl along the edge of buildings where they are protected on one side.

    • Never hike alone. Always have someone with you who can assist in an emergency.

    • Do not handle a freshly killed snake, it can still inject venom.

    • Teach children early to respect snakes and to leave them alone. Children are naturally curious and will pick up snakes.

    Is it a rattlesnake?

    Many a useful and non-threatening snake has suffered a quick death from a frantic human who has mistakenly identified a gopher snake, garter, racer or other as a rattlesnake. This usually happens when a snake assumes an instinctual defensive position used to bluff adversaries. A gopher snake has the added unfortunate trait of imitating a rattlesnake by flattening its head and body, vibrating its tail, hissing and actually striking if approached too closely.

    A rattlesnake is a heavy-bodied, blunt-tailed snake with one or more rattles on the tail. It has a triangular-shaped head, much broader at the back than at the front, and a distinct “neck” region. The rattlesnake also has openings between the nostrils and eyes, which is a heat-sensing pit. The eyes are hooded with elliptical pupils. Additional identifying characteristics include a series of dark and light bands near the tail, just before the rattles which are different from the markings on the rest of the body. Also note that rattles may not always be present, as they are often lost through breakage and are not always developed on the young.

    Keeping snakes out of the yard

    The best protection against rattlesnakes in the yard is a “rattlesnake proof” fence. It can be expensive and requires maintenance, however. The fence should either be solid or with mesh no larger than one-quarter inch. It should be at least three feet high with the bottom buried a few inches in the ground. Slanting your snake fence outward about a 30-degree angle will help. Vegetation should be kept away from the fence since the snake could crawl to the top of an adjacent tree or shrub. Discourage snakes by removing piles of boards or rocks around the home. Use caution when removing those piles - there may already be a snake there. Encouraging and protecting natural competitors like gopher snakes, kingsnakes and racers will reduce the rattlesnake population in the immediate area. And, kingsnakes actually kill and eat rattlesnakes.

    What to do in the event of a snake bite

    Though uncommon, rattlesnake bites do occur, so have a plan in place for responding to any situation. Carry a portable phone, hike with a companion who can assist in an emergency, and make sure that family or friends know where you are going and when you will be checking in.

    The first thing to do if bitten is to stay calm. Generally, the most serious effect of a rattlesnake bite to an adult is local tissue damage which needs to be treated. Children, because they are smaller, are in more danger if they are bitten.

    Get to a doctor as soon as possible, but stay calm. Frenetic, high-speed driving places the victim at greater risk of an accident and increased heart rate. If the doctor is more than 30 minutes away, keep the bite below the heart, and then try to get to the doctor as quickly as possible.

    The California Poison Control Center advises:

    Stay calm
    Wash the bite area gently with soap and water
    Remove watches, rings, etc, which may constrict swelling
    Immobilize the affected area
    Transport safely to the nearest medical facility
  • JOIN SANTA ROSA VALLEY 4-H - CALLING ALL LEADERS
    Posted on: 2009-05-13
    Santa Rosa Valley 4-H is now registering kids 5 to 19 yrs old for the 2009/2010 4-H year. 4-H projects include horses, fashion, jewelry making, pygmy goats, guinea pigs, cake decorating, motorcycles, lambs, swine, model trains and much more. 4-H teaches kids life skills, responsibility and community service. Come and see us at the Ventura County Fair this summer.

    Santa Rosa Valley 4-H is also looking for leaders. If you have some talent or skill that you can share with the kids in this valley please volunteer. Projects can be year-long or just two meetings to learn the skill - you decide. We would love to have leaders for sewing, gardening, woodworking, archery or any skill you can share.

    For more information on Santa Rosa Valley 4-H please call Terri Hargleroad at 805-552-0011.
  • Horse Clubs
    Posted on: 2009-04-08
    The Greater Los Angeles Paint Horse club serves all of Ventura and Los Angeles counties, Based in Simi Valley we hold monthly meetings and equestian events. We support all equestrian activities and perform charity work.
    We hold trail rides, horse shows, clinics, etc. All horse people are welcome to join. For futher info. please
    call Sue at 805 527-9655.
  • HELP SUPPORT THE SRTMS SCIENCE CENTER
    Posted on: 2009-01-31
    The Santa Rosa Technology Magnet School Science Foundation is currently raising funds to build a Science Center to meet the needs of our student population.

    Our middle school students do not have an adequate facility in which to study science, as do those at the larger middle schools in the PVSD. The facility we have designed will also allow SRTMS to offer after-school and special events to all of our K-8 students.

    SRTMS families have been very generous in helping raise the funds for the Science Center and we are at 75 percent of our goal of $110,000. But we still need help and are appealing to the Santa Rosa Valley community to help us reach our goal. Obviously, one can’t over-emphasize the importance of a high-quality public school to our children and the community. SRTMS is one of the reasons Santa Rosa Valley is such a desirable place to live.

    Donation levels begin at just $100 and all donors will be recognized with a tile depicting a dedication of their own on our Science Center Wall of Fame. These tiles will be permanently attached to the area surrounding the new SRTMS Science Center for all to see.

    Because SRTMS is a non-profit, your donation is tax deductible. Please take a few moments to read the attached information about the SRTMS Wall of Fame, and see a computer-generated rendering of the Science Center.

    Thank you,
    SRTMS Science Foundation

    * See attached FORM
  • Reverse 911
    Posted on: 2008-08-08

    The REVERSE 911 system covers the cities of Camarillo, Fillmore, Moorpark, Ojai, Oxnard, Port Hueneme, Santa Paula, and the unincorporated areas of Ventura County. CLICK ON THE LOGO TO SIGN UP!
  • Final specifications, plans and cost estimate for the SRR traffic signal improvements
    Posted on: 2008-04-07
    Please review the attached final report for the Santa Rosa Valley traffic signal improvement project. This has taken a lot of work and the input of the Santa Rosa Valley residents has been invaluable. For further information or questions, please contact: Kevin Cannon, Santa Rosa Valley community representative for this project. His email address is: avoking@roadrunner.com

    Click Here For the Report
  • Rattlesnake Time Again
    Posted on: 2008-03-15
    It seems as if it is too soon, but a Bridlewood resident reported that 2 snakes were found in a neighbors backyard. Reminder that many residents have been satisfied with the services of:
    Bo Slyapich
    The Rattlesnake Wrangler
    818-880-4269 (home)
    818-383-0476 (cell)
    Bo will travel to any area that needs him. Response time depends on traffic and location. Available 24 hours, 7 days a week.
  • Emergency Preparedeness Wildfire Pamphlet from County of Ventura
    Posted on: 2007-10-24

    'The most important action is to be prepared in advance. We back-up to what the Fire Department has labeled as one of the highest fire risk areas in the populated portion of the County, and it is important that we are prepared.'

    The Ventura County Fire Department has authored a pamphlet on this subject for your use. Please take a few moments to link to it, download it, print it and read it!
    It is available in electronic form (PDF) at the following URL:

    http://fire.countyofventura.org/publicinformation/publications/PDFs/wildland%20plan-12pg-mailer-rev1.pdf

  • Flood Maps to be Reviewed
    Posted on: 2006-01-09
    Consultant to review flood maps
    FEMA plan would require more people to get insurance

    By Cheri Carlson, ccarlson@VenturaCountyStar.com
    December 15, 2005

    Camarillo officials hired a consultant Wednesday to review new flood maps that more than double the size of the 100-year flood plain in the city.

    Broader boundaries would mean more people would have to buy flood insurance. But before that happens, city administrators said they would like to have the maps reflect construction projects planned by city and county agencies that are expected to change the proposed flood plain. One of those projects, replacing the Pleasant Valley Road bridge, is under way.

    Camarillo's City Council voted unanimously Wednesday night to hire Kasraie Consulting of Ventura to review the new maps and the science on which they were based. The firm, which was also hired by Moorpark officials to review its new maps, will be paid no more than $24,000.

    The updated maps, expected to go into effect next summer, were developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which last issued official flood maps in the 1980s. New rainfall data and runoff calculations were used to update the flood plain boundaries in the Calleguas Creek watershed that includes Camarillo, Moorpark, where the flood plain more than doubled in size, and Thousand Oaks and Simi Valley, which saw little change.

    Maps, issued to the cities in October, are in draft form and show the area at risk of flooding in a 100-year storm. There is a 1 percent chance of a flood of that size happening in any one year.

    FEMA officials recommend people in the flood plain buy insurance before the maps become final, which is expected to happen next summer.

    Late last month, FEMA officials opened a 90-day period for people to comment on the maps and technical appeals to be filed. During that period, cities and the county will be responsible for notifying residents of the map changes, according to FEMA.

    Tom Fox, Camarillo public works director, said the consultant the council agreed to hire Wednesday will have about 60 days to study the new maps and then the city will hold a public meeting on the issue.

    In other business, the council approved an agreement that would allow the city to take over the failing water system at the county-owned Camarillo Airport. Similar agreements are expected to be considered by other public agencies, including the county Board of Supervisors, early next year.
  • Local Realtor named among Century 21's highest achievers
    Posted on: 2005-09-27
    Century 21, one of the world's largest residential real estate franchisors, recognized Rosemary Allison of Century 21 America in Thousand Oaks as a member of its elite group of top 2005 Individual Producers at its mid-year awards.

    'Rosemary is a leader and innovator, empowering local homebuyers and sellers with valuable information, helping them to make informed real estate decisions,' said Richard L. Quinn, broker/owner of Century 21 America.

    Allison has 31 years in the real estate industry and has been with the Century 21 System for 21 years.

    'Rosemary's competitive intelligence, professionalism and dedication have made her a valued and trusted real estate resource for the Ventura County community and a major contributor to the overall success of our office and the Century 21 System as a whole,' Quinn said.

    Redefining the art of marketing luxury estates, Allison has utilized her unique marketing techniques and negotiating skills to become a leader in Prestige Estate sales throughout Ventura County. She specializes in marketing estates in the upscale neighborhoods of Westlake Village to Camarillo, and her career spans nearly three decades.

    In 2003, she doubled her sales volume to become the No. 1 Century 21 agent in the United States out of almost 100,000 agents in the nation. Her star-studded clientele includes many famous names in nearly every industry.

    As head of the Estates Division for Century 21 America, she is in a unique position to offer unparalleled knowledge and marketing expertise. She has unusual access to many confidential listings as well as extensive sales statistics to give her clients the competitive edge.

    Allison is a graduate of the Brokers Program at USC and lives in Santa Rosa Valley with her husband and children.

    She can be reached at 491-2100.
Santa Rosa Valley is compliments of:
Rosemary Allison
BRE LIC #00545184

Estate Director

Coldwell Banker Previews International
11521 Sumac Lane
Camarillo, CA 93012

Send an Email
View Website
Phone:
805 491-2100
Cell:
805-479-7653
Direct:
805-491-2100
Fax:
805-435-0407

Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate